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InternetDevels: Passing the baton of your contrib module

Mié, 01/31/2018 - 12:55

This was a blog post written by guest author Martin Postma (lolandese).
He usually writes directly on Drupal.org as an author of documentation.
Documentation is however not included on Drupal Planet so he asked us
to publish it on our blog to give it more exposure to stimulate the kick-off of this new initiative.

Read more

Drupal Association blog: Summary of the December 12, 2017 Board Meeting

Mié, 01/31/2018 - 12:38

On December 12, 2017, the board met virtually to close out final topics for the year ranging from board governance to reviewing the 2018 operational focus. You can find the meeting minutes, board packet and video recording here.

The board unanimously voted to approve changes to the Drupal Association bylaws. The main changes were:

  • The ability to pay an Officer. This allows us to pay Adam Goodman, our past board advisor, to serve as interim chair of the Board of Directors. In response to the community’s request for a neutral chair, Adam agreed to step into this role and will continue to help the board evolve strategically and orient itself around a chair that is not the founder of the project. The nominating committee will focus this year on finding a permanent chair. 

  • Update of the list of committees. The bylaws now reflect the committees that are in place today.

  • Clarity on meeting tools. This allows the board to meet virtually using more modern tools like video conferencing rather than conference lines.

The board also voted to approve the extention of  community elected board members’ seats so their term ends in November of their last year on the board rather than January. Shyamala Rajaram’s seat was extended from January 2018 to November 2018 and Ryan Szrama’s seat was extended from January 2019 to November 2019. We made this change so that community elected board member start and end their terms in the same month as the nominated members. This will provide smoother onboarding for our community elected board members.

Now that community elected board members will join the Board of Directors in November rather than January, community elections will be held this summer.

Additionally, Megan Sanicki, Drupal Association Executive Director, provided an update on 2017 staff achievements and shared the team’s 2018 goals and focus areas. The 2018 goal is to help grow adoption of Drupal 8 ambitious digital experiences including API-first solutions. We will do this by focusing our efforts in the following areas:

  1. Accelerate the adoption journey of ambitious digital experiences including API-first solutions

    • By inspiring & informing evaluators with case studies and other resources to help convert them into users faster/easier

    • By improving Drupal’s TCO and ease of use

  2. Strengthen the User Journey: Continue to delight existing users and help them expand Drupal usage

  3. Support community health

    • Support diversity with DrupalCon inclusion programs and by expanding the personas we serve as well as providing more global support

    • Strengthen the connection between BDFL and community through roundtable discussions and amplifying his messages to the community

    • Support community governance improvements as needed / requested

  4. Build a stronger foundation of support

    • Ensure staff satisfaction

    • Ensure organizational and financial health

    • Create better understanding, collaboration between DA & community

Specific details of the Drupal Association’s 2018 execution plan will be shared in a future blog post.

We hope you can join us for our 2018 board meetings, which will be announced soon.

Matt Glaman: Running Behat tests from CircleCI to a Platform.sh environment

Mié, 01/31/2018 - 12:00
Running Behat tests from CircleCI to a Platform.sh environment mglaman Wed, 01/31/2018 - 08:00 In client projects, I push for as much testing as possible. In Drupal 8 we finally have PHPUnit, which makes life grand and simpler. We use Kernel tests to run through some basic integration tests using a minimally bootstrapped database. However, we need Behat to cover behavior and functional testing on an existing site for speed and sanity reasons.

Mark Shropshire: Announcing the 2018 Charlotte Drupal Drive-in!

Mié, 01/31/2018 - 01:04

After two successful Charlotte Drupal Drive-in events in 2014 and 2015, the Charlotte Drupal User Group (CharDUG) is bringing it back on March 3rd, 2018. The format of the event is unconference style, allowing for a relaxed atmosphere where beginner and seasoned Drupalers alike are able discuss their projects, ideas, and ask questions.

Whether you want to discuss your projects with others, have an impromptu talk you would like to give, or a polished slide-deck presentation, you will be given the chance to pitch your idea(s). Once the pitches are made, every attendee will get to vote on the ones they find most interesting. This setup makes the event informal, the schedule fluid, and the topics dynamic. Most of all we have a lot of fun!

While Drupal is the focus, we will also welcome talks on development tools, JavaScript frameworks, decoupled Drupal, SEO, web marketing, hosting, and more. Bring a talk idea or just come and hangout! This year’s event will be at Charlotte North Carolina’s awesome Hygge Coworking at Camp North End. Thanks to our sponsors, we will have door prizes, coffee, snacks, and lunch provided free of charge! Did I tell you the event is free? Yep, it is!

Register for the March 3rd Charlotte Drupal Drive-in today! Hope to see you there!

Thank you to our fine sponsors!

If you want to learn more about the origins of the Charlotte Drupal Drive-in and what others think of past events, check out the links below!

Blog Category: 

Jacob Rockowitz: WTF: What's The Future Drupal?

Mar, 01/30/2018 - 21:11

I love these lyrics from "Talkin’ World War III Blues" because it reminds us that it’s impossible to get all of the people to agree on what is “right”. The best we can hope for is a fair and reasonable discussion followed by a compromise.

Two weeks ago, I published a blog post that stated the Webform module now depends on the Contribute module with a reasonable explanation as to why I was making the change. Some people aggressively pushed back about this approach, especially in the Webform module's issue queue. I completely agree that long-term change on what message is communicated as well as how the Drupal community presents itself in the actual software is going to happen in the issue queue on Drupal.org and at DrupalCon. The fact that people consider me promoting the concept of joining Drupal.org, becoming a member of the Drupal Association, and contributing back to Drupal an "ad" or "SPAM" is a troubling. I view "code as content". I feel that the Drupal community and Open Source needs a push in a more sustainable direction and I’ve used the Webform module and my two years of hard work as a 'soapbox' to make an important statement, which is "WTF: What's The Future Drupal?

"WTF?: What's the Future and Why It's Up to Us

So I just finished Tim O'Reilly's book titled "WTF?: What's the Future and Why It's Up to Us" and in his book, he passionately talks about how Open Source has shaped the world we see today and the future we see before us. O’Reilly says that Facebook and Google would not exist at the scale they are today without Open Source because both platforms are built on an open source stack of software. To me, that’s huge. O’Reilly’s book explores the key defining technology moments in our past, and how technology in the future is...Read More

Jeff Geerling's Blog: Drupal VM 4.8 and Drush 9.0.0 - Some major changes

Mar, 01/30/2018 - 20:34

tl;dr: Drupal VM 4.8.0 was just released, and it uses Drush 9 and Drush Launcher to usher in a new era of Drush integration!

Drush has been Drupal's stable sidekick for many years; even as Drupal core has seen major architectural changes from versions 4 to 5, 5 to 6, 6 to 7, and 7 to 8, Drush itself has continued to maintain an extremely stable core set of APIs and integrations for pretty much all the time I've been using it.


New Drush version, new Drush website!

Drupal Association blog: A look back at Global Training Days in 2017

Mar, 01/30/2018 - 17:35

Drupal Global Training Days (GTD) is an initiative of the community to introduce people to Drupal. The first events of the year were held just last Friday-Saturday, but more on that after we reflect on last year's progress. In 2017, GTD was held in 86 locations around the world. A lot of behind the scenes work happened last year to keep the project going, including the convening of a working group of trainers who had been participants in GTD in different regions of the world.


Here's what Drupical looks like when a GTD event is about to take place. So much yellow-orange!

Other noteworthy things happened in 2017 for Global Training Days. At DrupalCon Baltimore, the community included two BoFs where GTD history and challenges were discussed and progress was made to address the issues. In spring 2017 a survey was conducted to better understand the needs of the training hosts so improvements can be made in the future and 400 trainers were invited to participate. A new Twitter account @DrupalGTD was also started to keep the community informed and engaged on the project.

Highlights from the organizers

I invited three GTD hosts to answer some questions about their events to give us a view into what's happening in their local communities. Thanks Kirsten, Ildephonse, and Mauricio for participating.

Kirsten Burgard (bendygirl) from GovCon (Washington DC)

How did you get started in Global Training Days?

"We've been hosting D4G half days for several years, this year we started incorporating GTD into these events.  We were looking to get more structure into our training offerings and heard about the GTD project.  During DrupalCon Baltimore, a couple of our organizers were able to attend the Drupal Global Training Days BoF, and after that initial briefing on the project, we jumped right in. Drupal4Gov uses the GTD dates to coordinate community based training, extending our regular half-day events. Our goal is to offer a beginner session, but take advantage of the pre-coordinated space and time to offer intermediate and advanced sessions or additional topics like a Devops half day.  Drupal4Gov has hosted a training event on every GTD since attending the BoF at DrupalCon Baltimore, and we are committed to continuing that trend."

Who helped to make your training happen?

"Multiple speakers, organizers and hosts. Last year, we had National Agricultural Library (in spring), Taoti (in June), Chief (in September), and Department of Interior and Debug Academy (in December). This month, Booz Allen Hamilton and Government CIO Magazine hosted us January 26th and 27th.

Maurcio Dinarte (dinarcon) allowed us the use of his “Understanding Drupal” material for our very first official GTD at Taoti and since then we’ve used the free D8 Site Building training videos provided by Acquia in coordination with OSTraining.  Our wonderful community speakers provide additional training material that expand on the GTD efforts."

How many attended your training events in 2017 and what did they say they wanted to learn?

Our class sizes are limited by the spaces we are able to secure and the course material we are looking to teach.

Here are the number of people that registered for our events:

2017

  • April - 78

  • June - 30

  • September - 20

  • December - 33

2018

  • January - 78 (plus speakers), 8 (including host and speaker)

We have surveyed our users and the responses are always positive.  When asked about future trainings, most attendees simply asked for more of the same and/or a continuation to build on what they just learned.

What new knowledge did attendees receive from you?

"We do a decompress at the end of our events and at the beginning, we ask how many Drupal4Gov events they’ve attended. At our April DevOps event I asked the usual, ‘How many of you are at your 1st Drupal4Gov event’ and nearly 80% of attendees had never heard of us much less worked with Drupal. This was their first ever Drupal event. They stayed the entire time and most have come back for other events over the past year. Typically, less than half are brand new to a Drupal4Gov event. My favorite comment from any event also came from that, at the end, we ask, ‘What one thing did you learn here” and one of the speakers turned to the other two speakers and said ‘I met the other speakers and I think I can incorporate parts of their work into mine’ which is seriously awesome. We bring together people who didn’t know each other and when they leave, they feel empowered to work together to make Drupal and the Web better!

It’s probably important to explain what one of our events looks like. Please note, we limited seating to 70 and had 78 in attendance., we work really hard at not turning people away even when at capacity. So, here’s an example of the highly technical DevOps event we hosted with Zivtech, Mindgrub and the US Department of Agriculture at the National Agricultural Library:

Join Drupal4Gov for another of our Quarterly Half Day events.

This time around, we will limit to 70 attendees and spend 90 minutes each with Zivtech, Mindgrub and USDA Office of Communications about DevOps. And please note...NO COMPUTER NEEDED!

Zivtech will provide an in depth training on Probo.CI which provides environments for quality assurance and testing using the LAMP stack, complete with selenium testing and Solr search.

Mindgrub will discuss the internal processes that caused them to embrace the robot overlords and start to investigate devops automation.

USDA will close us out with how USDA.gov is using a combination of PHP7, MariaDB v10.1.21, and Varnish 4 deployed on the USDA Enterprise Platform Shared Service (available to all government agencies) which leverages Salt, Rancher, and Docker. Coupled with CDNs they had around 50k/requests per minute to the backend servers.

So, join local govies, contractors, private sector, non profits and more for amazing discussion about DevOps and testing. You have options, let's explore them together."

Maurcio Dinarte (dinarcon) from Nicaragua

Who helped to make your training happen?

"For the first edition of the training, it took Lucas Hedding and myself several months to create the curriculum. We were also supported by Norman García, who let us use a lab of his computer science institute several times. Over the years, various people helped to improve the curriculum. Many of them were students who attended one of our trainings and got Drupal jobs afterwards."

How many attended your training events in 2017 and what did they say they wanted to learn?

"About 70 people attended our trainings in 2017. To date, the trainings have covered intro to Drupal material for the most part. Many attendees want to continue learning and they have asked for more advanced site building, theming, and module development material. We are going to start doing that with our next workshop which will focus on Views."

What new knowledge did attendees receive from you?

"In our trainings, we cover basic site building material: how to create nodes, content types, and fields; basic Views set up; block creation and placement; and some general CMS topics and Drupal practices. Most people who attend are completely new to Drupal or web development in general. They are generally impressed by how much can be done without writing a single line of code."

Ildephonse Bikino (bikilde) from Rwanda

Who helped to make your training happen?

"Our Rwanda Drupal Community is at its beginning. During 2017, I was assisted by one of my community members named Diane. The trainings were hosted by KLAB which provides an open space for IT entrepreneurs to collaborate and innovate in Kigali, Rwanda. It was initiated by the government. So they gave us space, projector and internet access at the venue."

How many attended your training events in 2017 and what did they say they wanted to learn?

"This year we had one series of trainings, were we got approximately 388 participants organized in 8 groups 50 each. We expected only 50 people, but we got such large number of people interested. This story was written on Drupal Community Spotlight.

The second GTD had only around 45 participants for a half-day session. We limited the number of applications, as I didn't have time to make a series again by that time."

What new knowledge did attendees receive from you?

"Drupal is not popular in Rwanda and 2017 was the first time we organized GTD. So the training included basics like: introduction to Drupal, Drupal installation, Drupal opportunities, and what is the Drupal community and how does it works. We used 6 hours per day for this training."

2018 is off to a great start

It's exciting to consider the momentum created at the 17 different locations that held GTD events this past weekend. Thanks to all the organizers and groups/companies who made these events possible! Here goes a lot of thanks in no particular order:

In Chisinau, Moldova, Drupal Moldova Association, Sergiu Nagailic (nikro), Anya Abchiche (anyaabchiche), Nicoleta Nagailic (afinika), Irina Basiul, Vladimir Melnic (vladimir-m), Alexei Seremet (alexeiseremet), Alex Goja (agoja), Mihaela Mirza, USAID Moldova and the Swedish Government, Adyax, and iHUB Chisinau.

Online, Wayne Eaker (zengenuity) at DrupalTutor.

Also online, David Needham (davidneedham) along with Drew Gorton (dgorton), Tessa Kriesel (tessak22), and Dwayne McDaniel (mcdwayne) at Pantheon.

In Managua, Nicaragua, Drupal Nicaragua along with Maurcio Dinarte (dinarcon) at Agaric.

In Eger, Hungary, Roland Molnár (roland.molnar) and Labor Association.

In Leeds, UK, Crispin Read (crispin) at Drupal Apprenticeship Scheme and Rachel Lawson (rachel_norfolk).

In Munich, Germany, Johannes Haseitl (derhasi), Jörg Matheisen (joergM), Serhad Serhad Güldürsün (D_D), Rouven Volk (rvolk), and Inviqa and undpaul.

In Porto, Lisbon, Drupal Porto, Omibee, Ricardo Marcelino (rfmarcelino), Adriana Vaz (adrianavaz), Beatriz Cunha (beatriz-cunha), João Machado (joum), and Filipe Pereira (fmfpereira).

In Tokyo, Japan, Kazu Hodota (hodota) at Gennai3 Corporation.

In Conil, Spain, Drupal Conil, 1xINTERNET and Forcontu.

In Peshawar, Pakistan, S M Azmat Shah (Drupak) at Drupak.

In Brisbane and Melbourne, Australia, Vladimir Roudakov (vladimiraus) at TEstudIO.

In Boston, Kay VanValkenburgh (kay_v) and Leslie Glynn (leslieg) and the Boston Drupal Group.

In Stanford, everyone at Stanford Open Source Lab.

In Washington DC, Kirsten Burgard (bendygirl) of the Drupal4Gov team, along with Arash Farazdaghi (afarazdaghi), Virginia Nguyen (v7nguyen) (also Drupal4Gov), Eric Robbins (erobbins), Alek Snyder (alsnyder), Sara Kieffer-Hess (sarakh), Nick Massa (nxmassa), Alexandra Screven (ascreven), Heting Li, and Connor Hoehn, all from Booz Allen Hamilton. Gerardo Maldonado (g3r4), John Shortess (johnshortess), Carla Briceno (chbriceno), and Rich Allen (richardcallen2386), all from Bixal. Jerome Wiley (jeromewiley) from Government CIO Magazine. Dan Schiavone (schiavone) from Snakehill/Drupal4Gov. Matt Mendonca (mattmendonca) at NIST. Jessica Dearie (jdearie) at EPA/Drupal4Gov.

GTD is happening again in March, June, September, and December. Anyone in the community can participate, and if you want a little advice on getting started, check out the GTD group where you can find the GTD Working Group if you need help.

Acro Media: Migrate Drupal Sprint Recap - Almost There!!!

Mar, 01/30/2018 - 14:41

Sprint Date: January 11 & 12, 2018

I knew it was going to be a good few days of sprinting when the first of our team (Vicki Spagnolo) pinged the group in IRC saying she was getting started. You see, this was a virtual sprint and Vicki, being in New Zealand, starts well before the rest of us. The excitement she had going into the sprint was contagious.

Bright and early, we had our first stand-up call on Google Hangouts. We discussed all of the tasks for the next few days and dove right into working on code. A lot of the benefit of a sprint is having others around with focus to review code, so we did a lot of reviews of each other's work. Lots of issues made it from “Needs Review” to “Reviewed and Tested by the Community” (RTBC), and we had several Core committers hanging out to assist us. Special thanks to Gabor Hojtsoy, Lee Rowlands and Jess Myrbo for all their commits over the 2 day sprint.

Some progress stats. We went into the sprint with 3 Core migrate modules that weren't marked as stable. The Migrate API module went stable during the sprint. The Migrate Drupal User Interface module had one blocking issues resolved, leaving a single blocker remaining (UPDATE: this has been resolved, too). Finally, the big one, the Migrate Drupal module itself has only a few limited blockers remaining, all related to i18n/multilingual use cases.

A great benefit of sprinting with a group is that we had people available who can provide guidance and direction on architecture. With the group, we landed on a good plan of action for all the remaining i18n/multilingual issues. We opened the sprint and saw significant progress on the first step in that plan. It isn't RTBC yet, but it should go soon. After which, we have to leverage the building blocks it provides for the remaining i18n/multilingual issues.

Yes, it's down to just a few issues. Once they are wrapped up (and we saw great progress, so I'm hoping soon), all of Migrate Drupal will go stable. I also expect that the Migrate Drupal UI module will go stable at the same time.

Summary:
  • 5 Critical blockers across the entire Migrate sub-system.
  • Migrate API module went stable! Only two more to go.
  • 25 issues worked on; all with significant progress seen during the sprint.
  • 15 commits, of which 10 were serious improvements in API documentation.
  • Remaining release blockers can be found here. Filter issue priority to ‘critical’. Feel free to jump in and help!
Modules involved: Special thanks:

A huge thanks to all the sprinter: GaborHojtsy (Gabor Hojtsy), heddn (Lucas Hedding), xjm (Jess Mybro), larowlan (Lee Rowlands), masipila (Markus Sipilä), maxocub (Maxime Turcotte), phenaproxima (Adam Hoenich), quietone (Vicki Spagnolo).

Another big thanks to all the corporate sponsors: Acquia, Acro Media and Savoir-Faire Linux.

Migrate your site!

Do you have an ecommerce site that you want to migrate to Drupal 8, but not sure how? We can help! Contact us to discuss your migration with one of our experts, no strings attached.

Web Wash: How to Implement Layouts using Bootstrap Layouts in Drupal 8

Mar, 01/30/2018 - 14:00

If you're planning to use Bootstrap on your Drupal 8 site, the first obvious thing to do is download and set up the Bootstrap theme. Then, during the site building process, there will come the point where you need to create a few layouts. These layouts could be used for content types with Display Suite, or for custom pages using Panels.

Implementing layouts using the Bootstrap grid system is simple thanks to the Bootstrap Layouts module.

Bootstrap Layouts is a module that ships a bunch of prebuilt layouts using the grid system in Bootstrap. Best of all, these layouts can be used between Display Suite and Panels, or any module which supports the Layout Discovery module

The layouts are configurable through Drupal's administrative UI. For example, you can adjust the width of a two column layout by choosing grid CSS classes from a multi-select field.

Valuebound: An overview of Modules & Controllers in AngularJs

Mar, 01/30/2018 - 08:25

(This is the third post in my series on the AngularJS; check out my initial piece covering ‘An intro to AngularJS’ and ‘Data-binding methods in AngularJS’.

Before having a look at AngularJS’ components, terms and terminologies, let’s make sure everyone is on the same page. If not then you can go through our previous blogs “Introduction to AngularJs” and “…

Amazee Labs: Recap of our Zurich Drupal Meetup 2018

Mar, 01/30/2018 - 07:50
Recap of our Zurich Drupal Meetup 2018

Two weeks ago the first edition of the Drupal meetup 2018 (also my first ever) took place at our office. Besides discussing Drupal Community activities for 2018 in Switzerland,  Amazee Group CTO and Partner, Michael Schmid gave a presentation on «The possible future of React, GraphQL, and Drupal».

Vijay Dubb Tue, 01/30/2018 - 10:50

It was great to learn about how Amazee both tackled and created a decoupled Frontend and Backend Drupal site, and inspiring to have met so many great people from the Drupal community.

Presentation Recap

Especially for someone like me, who is new to the Drupal world, the presentation gave some significant insight. Here's how it helped me to further develop my understanding of all things Drupal, React and GraphQL.

GraphQL and Starwars

The first part was all about GraphQL and Star Wars, well, the Star Wars part was the API used for the demo. Having never used GraphQL much before, I appreciated the brief introduction to GraphQL and how much better it is to the regular rest API. You are welcome learn more about GraphQL from our blog posts.

Frontend tools

The second part was about the Frontend tools used: React, Apollo, and Redux. I knew at least 40% of this section already, thus having experience in this area, helped me feel comfortable. By implementing further education into our average working day, Amazee Labs is looking to become one of the leading agencies using React and Drupal.

It all comes together

After an introduction as to how both tools work separately, we now got to the most exciting part: understanding how both GraphQL and React work together with Drupal. During this section, I came to learn that there was an open source demo application that had been created by Amazee Labs. This got me excited, as it meant that I could not just use at Amazee Labs but am able to play with it in my own projects. Personally, I think it is pretty awesome when any company open sources everything, as it allows the community to both learn and contribute. Anyways, back to the point: is React and GraphQL with Drupal in a decoupled ecosystem the future? It for sure could be, what I know for sure, is that it is Amazee Labs’ future, and we are very excited about it.

If you would like to play around with the demo application, then feel free to clone the repository. Trust me you won’t be disappointed.

Also, feel free to watch the full presentation, including question and answers below.

About the future

There were many suggestions after the presentation. Heres a summary of the most notable discussion points.

Upcoming Meetups

A few meetups were arranged for the following dates.

  • Tuesday 20th of February at Liip
  • Wednesday 21st of March at Attribute
  • Wednesday 25th of April at Unic

There was also a discussion regarding meetups in other locations within Switzerland. Car sharing was suggested, to make this a feasible possibility. Fun. Right? 

The timing for the next meetup was another suggestion, where the Doors could open at 18:30 and the meetup start at 19:00.

Other topics we discussed
  • The next Drupal Mountain Camp
  • Drupal Switzerland Association

Including new conference topics, collaborations, case studies, and even a suggestion to redesign the current Drupal Switzerland site. After everything considered, I believe that the near future for the Local Drupal Community looks bright.

Thank you to all who participated and attended our meetup.

So what’s next?

Well, that would be our next meetup, which will be about the Ultimate Drupal Reference and will take place at Liip AG. Sign up here at meetup.com. See you there.

Jim Birch: I would like to nominate Kevin Thull for this year's Aaron Winborn Award

Mar, 01/30/2018 - 01:03

I would like to nominate Kevin Thull (kthull on Drupal.org) for this year's Aaron Winborn Award.  

If you have been to a Drupal camp in the last few years, you may have seen Kevin sprinting...  

...Sprinting from session room to session room making sure the speaker hit the big red record button.  

Kevin contributes to the Drupal community in a way that is different and unique, he helps record the sessions on video and posts them for free online.  If you haven't been to one of these camps, I hope you have taken the opportunity to watch some of the over 500 session recordings that he has posted online for all of us to learn from and advance our careers.

You can find a majority of the videos linked here:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWf6JWaRR8GIHbrZyDFhV3A/channels

You can find a listing of the camps he has recorded here:
https://www.drupal.org/u/kthull

I first met Kevin in 2013 at the first Drupal Camp Fox Valley.  A mutual friend asked if they could borrow a video camera as a backup to their session recording setup.  Turns out, they didn't need it as Kevin had already started dialing in his system.

He has a great series of blog posts at his personal site documenting his recording kit at http://www.bluedropshop.com/

Read more

Jim Birch: I would like to nominate Kevin Thull for this year's Aaron Winborn Award

Mar, 01/30/2018 - 01:03

I would like to nominate Kevin Thull (kthull on Drupal.org) for this year's Aaron Winborn Award.  

If you have been to a Drupal camp in the last few years, you may have seen Kevin sprinting...  

...Sprinting from session room to session room making sure the speaker hit the big red record button.  

Kevin contributes to the Drupal community in a way that is different and unique, he helps record the sessions on video and posts them for free online.  If you haven't been to one of these camps, I hope you have taken the opportunity to watch some of the over 500 session recordings that he has posted online for all of us to learn from and advance our careers.

You can find a majority of the videos linked here:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWf6JWaRR8GIHbrZyDFhV3A/channels

You can find a listing of the camps he has recorded here:
https://www.drupal.org/u/kthull

I first met Kevin in 2013 at the first Drupal Camp Fox Valley.  A mutual friend asked if they could borrow a video camera as a backup to their session recording setup.  Turns out, they didn't need it as Kevin had already started dialing in his system.

He has a great series of blog posts at his personal site documenting his recording kit at http://www.bluedropshop.com/

Read more

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: The quality of life and the effect it has on work performance

Mar, 01/30/2018 - 00:00
The way we work is constantly changing. The possibility to work remotely or distributed is something that has been with us for a long time. Even before the industrial revolution people tended to work at home. All professions we knew back in the time were working from their home. With the advent of the industrial revolution that has begun to change. Our ancestors were starting to work in organisations. The divide between what is home and what is workplace was getting deeper. As we developed more and more, our needs were bigger and bigger.    From shoes to cars  It may sound a little bit… READ MORE

Drupal Association blog: 2016 990 and Audit

Lun, 01/29/2018 - 19:46

Last year, the Drupal Association committed to not only providing more transparency into our financials, but also more clarity about where our funds come from and what they fund.

We completed our 2016 Audit and official financial reporting at the end of 2017. This post gives insight into 1) the audit 2) the 990s (our official financial report for the year) and 3) a new financial report called the “Weather Report”. 990s provide a one-year snapshot of program financials, but some of our programs have two years of expenses, like DrupalCon, so just looking at the 990s never gives the exact insight into how our events perform. The weather report provides this clarity. It will expand over time to provide clarity for more of our programs as well.

We did a financial audit for 2016

Audits are a good thing. In fact, our operations department welcomes them and appreciates the feedback.

To assist our board in their fiduciary obligations, we strive to conduct audits every other year. In the years that we don’t do an audit, we contract with our CPA firm, McDonald Jacobs, to do a financial review.

We conduct an audit for several reasons:

  • to demonstrate our commitment to financial transparency.
  • to assure our community that we follow appropriate procedures to ensure that the community funds are being handled with care.
  • to give our board of directors outside assurance that the financial statements are free of material misstatements.

For our 2016 audit, our auditors focused on three points:

  • Proper recording of income and expense: our auditors ensure that our financial statements are an accurate representation of the business we have conducted. Did we record transactions on the right date, to the right account, and the right class? In other words, if we said that 2016 revenue was a certain amount, is that really true?
  • Financial controls: preventing fraud is an important part of the audit. It is important to put the kinds of controls in place that can prevent common types of fraud, such as forged checks and payroll changes. Our auditors looked to see that there are two sets of eyes on every transaction, and that documentation is provided to verify expenses and check requests.
  • Policies and procedures: there are laws and regulations that require we have certain policies in place at our organization. Our auditors looked at our current policies to ensure they were in place and, in some cases, had been reviewed by the board and staff.

The primary goal of this audit is for our auditor to express an opinion on two aspects of the financial statements of the Association: the financial statements are fairly presented, and they are in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). Generally accepted accounting principles are the accepted body of accounting rules and policies established by the accounting profession. The purpose of these rules is to promote consistency and fairness in financial reporting throughout the business community. These principles provide comparability of financial information.

Our audit for 2016 is complete and has been reviewed and approved by the board. The results of our audit can be found here

In short, we received a clean bill of health with one recommendation from our Auditors (which is VERY good).  It is in how we open and deposit incoming checks:

"Controls over Checks Received
With the elimination of our physical office during 2016, the control of segregating certain duties has been eliminated. The Accountant now processes checks received in the mail. In this situation where the Accountant has access to the physical asset and the accounting records, there is an opportunity to misappropriate a check and void or delete the invoice billing in the accounting system. To mitigate the risk of this occurring without detection, the following recommendations can provide additional control:

  • As part of the monthly reconciliation process performed by the outside CPA firm, a review of voided and/or deleted invoices can be done with appropriate follow up and resolution.
  • Consider using a lockbox with your bank."

While our security checks are tight, adding the bank lock box process was suggested by our auditors to add an additional layer of security to prevent potential fraudulent activity.

A lockbox is a physical post office box controlled by the bank.  Checks are directed to this post office box, or “lockbox”, and checks are opened and scanned by bank employees.  Those checks are deposited into our account, and scans of the checks are uploaded and recorded in our banking portal.  This can be accessed and seen by all members of our accounting team.  Checks are now recorded into our accounting system by a different team member, since checks are now digitized and deposited by the bank - and are no longer physically deposited by only one team member.

Tax filing: The IRS Form 990

Once the audit is finished, our CPA can complete the 990 tax return for the year.

All U.S.-based 501c3 exempt organizations are required to file a 990 each year. Additionally, this form is also filed with state tax departments as well. The 990 is used by the IRS and state regulators to ensure that non-profits continue to serve their stated charitable activities. The 990 can be helpful when you are reviewing our programs and finances, but know this is only a “snapshot” of our year.  

You can find our past 990s here.

Here are some general points, when reviewing our 990:

FORM 990, PART I—REVENUES, EXPENSES, AND CHANGES IN NET ASSETS OR FUND BALANCES

Lines 8-12 indicates our yearly revenue. Not only how much total revenue (line 12), but also where we have earned our income, broken out into four groups. Line 12 is the most important: total income for the year which ended at $5.1 million.

Lines 13-18 shows expenses for the year which totaled $6.1 million for the year.

Cash Reserves are noted on line 20 of page 1.  Our year ended with 186k in net assets. The 990 has a comparison of the net assets from last year (or the beginning of the year) and the end of the current year, as well as illustrates the total assets and liabilities of the Association.  We ended 2015 with -$92K, and with our refocus in 2016 we closed the year up, at $185k in net assets.

FORM 990, PART II—SIGNATURE BLOCK

Sign off on our 990 by our Treasurer Tiffany Farriss & CPA Representative McDonald Jacobs partner Sang Ahn.

FORM 990, PART III—STATEMENT OF PROGRAM SERVICE ACCOMPLISHMENTS

In Part III, we describe the activities performed in the previous year that adhere to our 501c3 designation.  You can see here that Drupal.org, DrupalCon and our Fiscal Sponsorship programs are highlighted noting the expenses and income for each program.  Keep in mind that this is only a year snapshot, as DrupalCons span a couple of years, ramping up and winding down.

FORM 990, PART IV -  CHECKLIST OF REQUIRED SCHEDULES

This is a checklist of schedules that must be completed and accompany the 990 filing.  Any “yes” answers checked here will produce a schedule to explain the “yes” answer in detail.

FORM 990, PART V - STATEMENTS REGARDING OTHER IRS FILINGS AND TAX COMPLIANCE

This is a place for statements about other IRS filings and tax compliance such as receiving tax deductible contributions, and noting that we have provided donors with required substantiation for their donations.

FORM 990, PART VI - GOVERNANCE, MANAGEMENT AND DISCLOSURE

This is for us to note detailed information regarding our governing body, management, and policies of our organization.

FORM 990, PART VII - LIST OF OFFICERS, DIRECTORS, TRUSTEES AND KEY EMPLOYEES

Part VII lists our board and staff who are responsible in whole or in part for the operations of an organization. These entries do include titles and compensation of key employees.

Section B—Compensation of the Five Highest Paid Independent Contractors for Professional Services
We list any of our contractors, if we have paid them more than $50,000, on this schedule.

FORM 990, PART VIII - Statement of Revenue

This is a snapshot of where our revenue comes from, what is exempt or not exempt as taxable income. For 2016, $573,247 was considered taxable.

FORM 990, Part IX Statement of Functional Expenses

This section classifies the total amount earned for the year into three different buckets; fundraising, general, and program expense. These are expenses related to running those three different types of programs.

FORM 990, Part X, XI and XII Balance Sheet

This is a comparison of our 2016 balance sheet from beginning of the year to the end of the year, along with notes about the account method we use (accrual) and independent auditor and who is responsible for oversight.

Additional Filing to the 990, Schedule A — Public Charity Status and Public Support

A tax exempt organization must meet certain public support tests in order to maintain its status as a public charity. Schedule A provides an opportunity to see the various sources of revenue have increased or declined over the last four or five years. Please be aware that the definitions of revenue for the purposes of the support schedule are not directly comparable to Part I of the Form 990.

Additional various schedules following the 990, show large contributions (5k +), activities outside of the United States (ie grants given outside of the US), assets depreciation and other various activities.

Now that our 2016 990 has been reviewed by the board and approved, we have filed it. From there we are required to post the return publicly, which we do here on our website. 

Weather Report — Review of 2016

As part of our work to ensure financial health, our virtual CPA firm Summit compiles a “weather report” monthly so we can compare particular data points and see if we are reaching to our set KPIs. 

In closing the year 2016, Summit prepared this report for the year.

Revenue —the Drupal Association creates income in four different ways:

  • Advertising, which consists of ad sales on Drupal.org.
  • Events - DrupalCon income
  • Fundraising consisting of any donations or membership sales
  • Other Income, which comprises income from digital sponsors, Supporting Partner sales and time and material projects.

The graph below shows the breakdown of revenue for 2016.

Expenses — The Drupal Association has expenses which are categorized in the following ways:

  • Production Expense:These are the costs associated directly with earning revenue (for example: paying employees who work directly with the revenue streams described above, direct event costs, marketing event costs, IT costs, etc.)
  • Administrative Costs: These are general costs associated with running the organization (for example: administrative employees, accounting fees, insurance, professional fees, etc)
  • Sales and Marketing Costs: These are costs for marketing the Drupal organization (mostly Marketing employees)
  • Facility Costs: These are costs associated with the physical office space employees work. (Drupal moved a distributed workforce in the end of 2016, so these costs will be minimal going forward.)

KPI Goals — Moving into 2017, we set the following goals for Drupal.org.

  • Cash Reserve – Have 30% of forecasted YTD revenue in the bank.  As of the end of 2016 we have $397K (27% of the goal) in the bank.
  • Net Income – Have a Year End Net Income greater than 10%.  In 2016 we achieved a Net Income margin of -1%.

Event Summary — The graphs below present the 2016 and 2015 DrupalCon events

2016 results show us in the middle of our financial recovery.  As we moved into 2017, we took deep looks into our operations and programs to ensure financial health and growth. We will have a 2017 update after we close our financial review and 990 filing for the year.

We are thankful for the great team work that went into new financial reporting process and the resulting data to help us push towards our financial goals. Additionally, and as always, we are truly thankful to our financial contributors who provide the financial fuel for us to do our mission work.

MTech, LLC: Two Down, One to Go

Lun, 01/29/2018 - 14:02
Two Down, One to Go

Today, the final blocker for Migrate Drupal UI was committed. That leaves only a series of complicated internationalization (i18n) issues to get resolved for Migrate Drupal before all of migrate in all of Drupal core can be considered stable. Lots of effort by lots of people have gone into the UI. Thanks to each one of them.

If you have been on the fence, waiting to upgrade, now is the time to do that. 80 percent of all Drupal 6 and Drupal 7 sites do not use i18n features. If you are in that large camp, just waiting to upgrade, then the upgrade path for you is fully stable NOW.

Lucas Hedding Mon, 01/29/2018 - 10:02

Chapter Three: Dreditor Refresh: A New User Style for Dreditor

Lun, 01/29/2018 - 12:26

Dreditor is a beloved and indispensable tool, in the form of a browser extension, that enhances project issue pages on Drupal.org. When it comes to reviewing patches, it turns what would just be a plain text file into a feature rich interface for reviewing patches, allowing users to easily select and comment on lines of code, which then get pasted into the comment form, as properly formatted HTML.

I've been lucky to have some extra community time here at Chapter Three over the past couple of weeks. While perusing the core issue queue, I decided to resurrect an old User Style I created for Dreditor back in 2009, and give Dreditor a little refresh. You can install the Dreditor Refresh style with Stylish here. Make sure you also have Dreditor installed, and have logged into Drupal.org.

DrupalEasy: DrupalEasy Podcast 204 - Tim Lehnen and Neil Drumm - Drupal.org tooling

Lun, 01/29/2018 - 10:41

Direct .mp3 file download.

Tim Lehnen, (hestenet), Director of Engineering for the Drupal Association and Neil Drumm (Drumm, Senior Technologist at the Drupal Association join Mike Anello to take a bit of a deep dive into the continuing evolution of Drupal.org tooling - specifically the modernization of the issue queue, patch process, code reviews, and more. Along the way, we try to figure out where (when?) the phrase "feather in your cap" comes from, exactly what Neil does in his free time, and why Mike isn't nearly as cool as he thinks.

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Amazee Labs: GraphQL for Drupalers - part 4 - fetching the entities

Lun, 01/29/2018 - 07:47
GraphQL for Drupalers - part 4 - fetching the entities

GraphQL is becoming more and more popular every day. Now that we have a beta release of the GraphQL module (mainly sponsored and developed by Amazee Labs) it's easy to turn Drupal into a first-class GraphQL server. In this series, we'll try to provide an overview of its features and see how they translate to Drupal.

Blazej Owczarczyk Mon, 01/29/2018 - 10:47

In the last post we talked about the basic building blocks of every GraphQL query - the fields. We've discussed their types and traits as well as described the rules according to which Drupal fields turn into GraphQL fields. This week we were going to expand the topic further and cover field creation, but Daniel Noyola asked an interesting question in the comment below one of the recent articles:

How can I filter the results in a nodeQuery? Like I would in a normal View or with the "where" clause in a SQL Statement. I noticed that it receives a NodeQueryFilterInput but I don't see how to use it.

Fetching entities based on a filter or a set of filters is a common use case, so let's focus on that first.

TL;DR

There are two ways to query the entity repository. First one would be through the entityQuery fields which are shipped with the core module but are limited in functionality. They only allow us to filter by base fields and there's no way to use an operator other than equals to. The other approach is much more powerful, as it's based on Views. It requires an additional module - graphql_views - to be installed though. Let's start with the built-in way.

The nodeQuery

Each entity type in the system gets its own query field. Let's see in the explorer how it looks like for nodes:

So it's a field (blue) with 3 arguments: offset, limit and filter (purple) which returns a value of type EntityQueryResult (all types are in yellow).

The first two arguments, offset and limit, are for paging and they work the same way as in SQL. Both are integers and both have default values of 0 and 10 respectively (green). Arguments that have default values can be omitted. We'll use this feature in a while.

The last argument - filter - is of a complex type NodeQueryFilterInput. Let's click it:

So it comprises all the base fields of the entity type that is being queried. It's not enough to issue arbitrary queries but it will suffice for a simple use case. This is how we could fetch a list of articles created by a given user:

We haven't specified the offset nor the limit, so they'll get their default values. It means that the output will contain at most 10 results, starting from the result number 0.

That's cool, but what if we wanted to order the articles by node id (nid) to only show the latest articles? Or filter by tags? Or fetch the title text of an image that is attached to a media entity that is connected with the first event that starts after the article's release date?

Use The Views

The answer is: we can do it like we'd normally do it in Drupal - with a view. Views integration has been moved to a separate project, so it has to be downloaded with composer (composer require drupal/graphql_views), from drupal.org or from github.

With graphql_views enabled we can add a GraphQL display to any view in the system.

Now we can sort the results, filter based on content fields and add relationships. We also have the option to return either the full entities, just a selection of fields, or even search results taken straight from a search server.

Contextual filters set in the view will automatically turn into the arguments of the GraphQL field. Let's see an example:

This field represents a simple view showing nodes. It has one contextual filter - Content: Authored by - so the corresponding input type consists of just one field:

and its row type is set to Entity (as pictured on the screenshot above), so the result will be of type NodeArticle:

We can use the filed like this:

Views integration is a pretty broad topic, so in the next post we might try to cover it in more detail. There are quite a few more interesting aspects like sorting, exposed filters, and attaching views to entities, so we'll focus on that in an attempt to fully answer Daniel's question. For those interested in the back-end side of things I'd recommend the great Extending GraphQL series by Philipp Melab. The first post that explains how to create fields is here: Extending GraphQL: Part 1 - Fields.

P.S. GraphQL Views is not stable yet. In fact, two issues were spotted and fixed in the process of writing this article. If you spot a bug please report it on github  or let us know in the #graphql channel at Drupal slack.

Other posts in the series

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