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Drupal Association blog: Intellect, fire, water, and medieval castles at Lutsk Drupal Camp 2017

Lun, 11/13/2017 - 14:43

This story is reposted from Drudesk.com thanks to Drupal Ukraine Community.

Hello everyone! Drupal Ukraine Community is thriving. Last year’s Lviv Drupal Camp 2016 seems like only yesterday, but now it’s time to share our latest camp with you. This is the story of Lutsk Drupal Camp 2017, the annual camp for all Ukrainian Drupalers. We promise you a really interesting story. After all, who’s able to tell you more about the event than the organizers — the teams from Drudesk and InternetDevels, powered by Drupal Ukraine Community? Let’s go!

Lutsk Drupal Camp 2017 and its blue ocean

The official logo for Lutsk Drupal Camp 2017 was the Druplicon’s “infinity” eyes with scenes of Lutsk city reflected in them. It also resembled a fish to many. At Lutsk Drupal Camp, the blue color of the eyes was everywhere — on T-shirts, badges, backpacks, notebooks, and so on. Wherever you stepped, the blue wave carried you. And the main hero in this story was our favorite “drop” — Drupal!

+1 step to DrupalCon Ukraine

It’s no secret that the Ukranian Drupal community dreams about hosting DrupalCon in Ukraine some day. Holding Drupal Camp in the ancient and cosy city of Lutsk is one more step to holding DrupalCon in Ukraine!

Lutsk Drupal Camp 2017,  the main event

Starting with the morning’s registration, it was clear that the day would turn out incredibly positive. The organizers (in dark blue T-shirts) worked like busy bees taking care of every small detail and were ready to solve any possible problem.

Luckily, there were no problems to solve! Well, okay there was just one. The speakers at Lutsk Drupal Camp 2017 were so awesome that it was hard to choose which sessions to attend! They touched upon the most interesting and modern aspects of Drupal development, asked about the audience’s experiences and shared their own.

The concentration of famous speakers per square meter of space was sometimes so high it made you dizzy. They were also glad to receive the certificates of appreciation from us!

During Lutsk Drupal Camp 2017, there was also a time to catch up for old and new friends.

And even for some sports.

Of course, Drupalers are driven by inspiration, but some additional snacks never go amiss.

But this was just a rehearsal before the main lunch we all had together at Lutsk Drupal Camp 2017.

Of course, it isn’t Camp without Drudesk and InternetDevels team taking photos together.

And with all the guests as well.

Lutsk Drupal Camp 2017 and the flames of our love for Drupal

After all the speeches finished, the sponsors named the winners of their prize drawings, and the closing ceremony summed up this big day, there was more  to look forward to. The big party in the XIV century medieval Lubart’s castle was a chance for all the guests to see Lutsk' main attraction and, of course, to enjoy each other’s company.

The friendly atmosphere, hot snacks, and the energy of vibrant music played by the rock band warmed up the cool evening.

But we had something even hotter, too, as our love for Drupal kindled into real fire. The fire show within the medieval walls was truly impressive. The final touch was “Lutsk Drupal Camp 2017” “written” with fire. 

Thanks to everyone involved in the awesome Lutsk Drupal Camp 2017. Hope to see you again soon! Follow us on Facebook and other social media. Find Drupal Ukraine community at drupal.org/drupal-ukraine-community.

Dries Buytaert: Mike Sullivan joins Acquia as CEO

Lun, 11/13/2017 - 13:59

Today, I am excited to announce that Michael Sullivan will be joining Acquia as its CEO.

The search for a new CEO

Last spring, Tom Erickson announced that he was stepping down as Acquia's CEO. For over eight years, Tom and I have been working side-by-side to build and run Acquia. I've been lucky to have Tom as my partner as he is one of the most talented leaders I know. When Tom announced he'd be stepping down as Acquia's CEO, finding a new CEO became my top priority for Acquia. For six months, the search consumed a good deal of my time. I was supported by a search committee drawn from Acquia's board of directors, including Rich D'Amore, Tom Bogan, and Michael Skok. Together, we screened over 140 candidates and interviewed 10 in-depth. Finding the right candidate was hard work and time consuming, but we kept the bar high at all times. As much as I enjoyed meeting so many great candidates and hearing their perspective on our business, I'm glad that the search is finally behind me.

The right fit for Acquia

Finding a business partner is like dating; you have to get to know each other, build trust, and see if there is a match. Identifying and recruiting the best candidate is difficult because unlike dating, you have to consider how the partnership will also impact your team, customers, partners, and community. Once I got to know Mike, it didn't take me long to realize how he could help scale Acquia and help make our customers and partners successful. I also realized how much I would enjoy working with him. The fit felt right.

With 25 years of senior leadership in SaaS, enterprise content management and content governance, Mike is well prepared to lead our business. Mike will join Acquia from Micro Focus, where he participated in the merger of Micro Focus with Hewlett Packard Enterprise's software business. The combined company became the world's seventh largest pure-play software company and the largest UK technology firm listed on the London Stock Exchange. At Micro Focus and Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Mike was the Senior Vice President and General Manager for Software-as-a-Service and was responsible for managing over 30 SaaS products.

This summer, I shared that Acquia expanded its focus from website management to data-driven customer journeys. We extended the capabilities of the Acquia Platform with journey orchestration, commerce integrations and digital asset management tools. The fact that Mike has so much experience running a diverse portfolio of SaaS products is something I really valued. Mike's expertise can guide us in our transformation from a single product company to a multi-product company.

Creating a partnership

For many years, I have woken up everyday determined to set a vision for the future, formulate a strategy to achieve that vision, and help my fellow Acquians figure out how to achieve that vision.

One of the most important things in finding a partner and CEO for Acquia was having a shared vision for the future and an understanding of the importance of cloud, Open Source, data-driven experiences, customer success and more. This was very important to me as I could not imagine working with a partner who isn't passionate about these same things. It is clear that Mike shares this vision and is excited about Acquia's future.

Furthermore, Mike's operational strength and enterprise experience will be a natural complement to my focus on vision and product strategy. His expertise will allow Acquia to accelerate its mission to "build the universal platform for the world's greatest digital experiences."

Formalizing my own role

In addition to Mike joining Acquia as CEO, my role will be elevated to Chairman. I will also continue in my position as Acquia CTO. My role has always extended beyond what is traditionally expected of a CTO; my responsibilities have bridged products and engineering, fundraising, investor relations, sales and marketing, resource allocation, and more. Serving as Chairman will formalize the various responsibilities I've taken on over the past decade. I'm also excited to work with Mike because it is an opportunity for me to learn from him and grow as a leader.

Acquia's next decade

The web has the power to change lives, educate the masses, create new economies, disrupt business models and make the world smaller in the best of ways. Digital will continue to change every industry, every company and every life on the planet. The next decade holds enormous promise for Acquia and Drupal because of what the power of digital holds for business and society at large. We are uniquely positioned to deliver the benefits of open source, cloud and data-driven experiences to help organizations succeed in an increasingly complex digital world.

I'm excited to welcome Mike to Acquia as its CEO because I believe he is the right fit for Acquia, has the experience it takes to be our CEO and will be a great business partner to bring Acquia's vision to life. Welcome to the team, Mike!

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: Discovering clients expectations is vital. How do we do it?

Lun, 11/13/2017 - 08:53
When starting to talk with a potential client both parties are to some extent unaware what one has to offer and what the other can expect. It is of vital importance you define and manage expectations in such a manner both parties will be satisfied with results. In the next couple of paragraphs, I will outline our approach to setting expectations right up until the day the onboarding process takes place. If all checkboxes up to that point were marked, the developer won’t have any issues when working with the client.  What do we have to offer In my previous blog posts, I did write about ways… READ MORE

Roman Agabekov: How to stay out of SPAM folder? Setting up PTR, SPF, DKIM under Exim

Sáb, 11/11/2017 - 21:39
How to stay out of SPAM folder? Setting up PTR, SPF, DKIM under Exim Submitted by admin on Sat, 11/11/2017 - 23:39

In the previous article, we covered teaching your Drupal installation to send mail to users. But that is only half the battle, now we need to make sure the mail we send hits Inbox and not Spam folder. This article describes some options you have that offer relevant solutions. Unfortunately, no one can guarantee 100% inbox hits, but keeping the amount of mail filtered to Spam to a minimum is quite possible.

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Drupal core announcements: New Drupal 8 committer: Francesco Placella!

Sáb, 11/11/2017 - 20:40

I am pleased to announce that Francesco Placella (plach) has accepted our invitation to be a Drupal 8 provisional framework manager.

Based in Venice, Italy, Francesco has been contributing to core since 2009. During the Drupal 7 lifecycle he was mainly active in the multilingual area, revamping the language negotiation and content translation subsystems. His initial contributions were really well received:

As well as some great progress on the code front, another major success of the virtual sprint was bringing in some significant new contributors. A highlight here would be Francesco Placella, who is playing a lead role in the work on translatable fields. [...] Drupal needs more contributors like Francesco, and if this sprint has helped him find his place in Drupal development that in itself is a major gain for the community.

After being appointed a maintainer for Drupal core's Language system and the Content translation module, Francesco joined the Drupal 8 Multilingual Initiative, soon becoming one of its most active contributors. Mainly focused on the content translation aspects, he gradually became heavily involved in the entity and field systems, with foundational work on the form and storage subsystems.

Francesco was also very active in the Drupal 8 Accelerate program, which had the goal of fixing all the outstanding critical bugs that were blocking the release of Drupal 8.0.0. This gave him the opportunity to expand his activity also in many other areas, with a particular focus on Views performance. Drupal 8.0.0 was eventually released and Francesco took a break to look after his newborn son.

Francesco showed up again at DrupalCon Vienna and we thought it would be a good time to ask him to become a framework manager. He gladly accepted, so please join me in welcoming him to the core committer team.

Drupal.org blog: Shortcuts and Friendly URLs for Issues

Vie, 11/10/2017 - 20:27

Drupal developers have been shouting node id numbers across tables at sprints for almost 15 years now. The Drupal Association has added some shortcuts and friendly urls for issues to make this a little easier.

Shortcuts

The first shortcut we added is a searchbar feature. If you enter any node id in the search bar you'll be automatically redirected to that node. This works for more than just issues!

The second shortcut we added is a quick url pattern for finding issues. If you know your node id, just type:

https://drupal.org/i/<node-id>

 and you're there!

Friendly-Urls

We've implemented a new friendly url pattern on Drupal.org to make the canonical urls more sensible and search engine friendly.

Project pages: https://drupal.org/project/drupal

Issue Queue: https://drupal.org/project/issues/drupal

Specific Issue: https://drupal.org/project/issues/drupal/2922626

This new pattern should be backfilled to all issues by the beginning of next week.

And of course, if you have old bookmarks linked, you can still get there by going to: https://drupal.org/node/<node-id>

These are small, but powerful improvements that should make the lives of everyone who contributes to the Drupal project easier.

Drupal blog: An update on the Media Initiative for Drupal 8.4/8.5

Vie, 11/10/2017 - 13:49

This blog has been re-posted with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

In my blog post, "A plan for media management in Drupal 8", I talked about some of the challenges with media in Drupal, the hopes of end users of Drupal, and the plan that the team working on the Media Initiative was targeting for future versions of Drupal 8. That blog post is one year old today. Since that time we released both Drupal 8.3 and Drupal 8.4, and Drupal 8.5 development is in full swing. In other words, it's time for an update on this initiative's progress and next steps.

8.4: a Media API in core

Drupal 8.4 introduced a new Media API to core. For site builders, this means that Drupal 8.4 ships with the new Media module (albeit still hidden from the UI, pending necessary user experience improvements), which is an adaptation of the contributed Media Entity module. The new Media module provides a "base media entity". Having a "base media entity" means that all media assets — local images, PDF documents, YouTube videos, tweets, and so on — are revisable, extendable (fieldable), translatable and much more. It allows all media to be treated in a common way, regardless of where the media resource itself is stored. For end users, this translates into a more cohesive content authoring experience; you can use consistent tools for managing images, videos, and other media rather than different interfaces for each media type.

8.4+: porting contributed modules to the new Media API

The contributed Media Entity module was a "foundational module" used by a large number of other contributed modules. It enables Drupal to integrate with Pinterest, Vimeo, Instagram, Twitter and much more. The next step is for all of these modules to adopt the new Media module in core. The required changes are laid out in the API change record, and typically only require a couple of hours to complete. The sooner these modules are updated, the sooner Drupal's rich media ecosystem can start benefitting from the new API in Drupal core. This is a great opportunity for intermediate contributors to pitch in.

8.5+: add support for remote video in core

As proof of the power of the new Media API, the team is hoping to bring in support for remote video using the oEmbed format. This allows content authors to easily add e.g. YouTube videos to their posts. This has been a long-standing gap in Drupal's out-of-the-box media and asset handling, and would be a nice win.

8.6+: a Media Library in core

The top two requested features for the content creator persona are richer image and media integration and digital asset management.

The results of the State of Drupal 2016 survey show the importance of the Media Initiative for content authors.

With a Media Library content authors can select pre-existing media from a library and easily embed it in their posts. Having a Media Library in core would be very impactful for content authors as it helps with both these feature requests.

During the 8.4 development cycle, a lot of great work was done to prototype the Media Library discussed in my previous Media Initiative blog post. I was able to show that progress in my DrupalCon Vienna keynote:

The Media Library work uses the new Media API in core. Now that the new Media API landed in Drupal 8.4 we can start focusing more on the Media Library. Due to bandwidth constraints, we don't think the Media Library will be ready in time for the Drupal 8.5 release. If you want to help contribute time or funding to the development of the Media Library, have a look at the roadmap of the Media Initiative or let me know and I'll get you in touch with the team behind the Media Initiative.

Special thanks to Angie Byron for contributions to this blog post and to Janez Urevc, Sean Blommaert, Marcos Cano Miranda, Adam G-H and Gábor Hojtsy for their feedback during the writing process.

Dries Buytaert: An update on the Media Initiative for Drupal 8.4/8.5

Vie, 11/10/2017 - 09:54

In my blog post, "A plan for media management in Drupal 8", I talked about some of the challenges with media in Drupal, the hopes of end users of Drupal, and the plan that the team working on the Media Initiative was targeting for future versions of Drupal 8. That blog post is one year old today. Since that time we released both Drupal 8.3 and Drupal 8.4, and Drupal 8.5 development is in full swing. In other words, it's time for an update on this initiative's progress and next steps.

8.4: a Media API in core

Drupal 8.4 introduced a new Media API to core. For site builders, this means that Drupal 8.4 ships with the new Media module (albeit still hidden from the UI, pending necessary user experience improvements), which is an adaptation of the contributed Media Entity module. The new Media module provides a "base media entity". Having a "base media entity" means that all media assets — local images, PDF documents, YouTube videos, tweets, and so on — are revisable, extendable (fieldable), translatable and much more. It allows all media to be treated in a common way, regardless of where the media resource itself is stored. For end users, this translates into a more cohesive content authoring experience; you can use consistent tools for managing images, videos, and other media rather than different interfaces for each media type.

8.4+: porting contributed modules to the new Media API

The contributed Media Entity module was a "foundational module" used by a large number of other contributed modules. It enables Drupal to integrate with Pinterest, Vimeo, Instagram, Twitter and much more. The next step is for all of these modules to adopt the new Media module in core. The required changes are laid out in the API change record, and typically only require a couple of hours to complete. The sooner these modules are updated, the sooner Drupal's rich media ecosystem can start benefitting from the new API in Drupal core. This is a great opportunity for intermediate contributors to pitch in.

8.5+: add support for remote video in core

As proof of the power of the new Media API, the team is hoping to bring in support for remote video using the oEmbed format. This allows content authors to easily add e.g. YouTube videos to their posts. This has been a long-standing gap in Drupal's out-of-the-box media and asset handling, and would be a nice win.

8.6+: a Media Library in core

The top two requested features for the content creator persona are richer image and media integration and digital asset management.

The results of the State of Drupal 2016 survey show the importance of the Media Initiative for content authors.

With a Media Library content authors can select pre-existing media from a library and easily embed it in their posts. Having a Media Library in core would be very impactful for content authors as it helps with both these feature requests.

During the 8.4 development cycle, a lot of great work was done to prototype the Media Library discussed in my previous Media Initiative blog post. I was able to show that progress in my DrupalCon Vienna keynote:

The Media Library work uses the new Media API in core. Now that the new Media API landed in Drupal 8.4 we can start focusing more on the Media Library. Due to bandwidth constraints, we don't think the Media Library will be ready in time for the Drupal 8.5 release. If you want to help contribute time or funding to the development of the Media Library, have a look at the roadmap of the Media Initiative or let me know and I'll get you in touch with the team behind the Media Initiative.

Special thanks to Angie Byron for contributions to this blog post and to Janez Urevc, Sean Blommaert, Marcos Cano Miranda, Adam G-H and Gábor Hojtsy for their feedback during the writing process.

CTI Digital: NWDUG Unconference 2017

Vie, 11/10/2017 - 08:00

I always look forward to unconferences. It’s their unpredictability and element of surprise that I enjoy, you never quite know what the day will bring. I love the edgy feel, the lower barrier to entry, and that it’s OK to fluff your words or try something new. Sensing the nerves of the ones who unexpectedly present for the first time, witnessing how energising their experience is, discovering a topic or theme for the first time, or taking the mic because you feel inspired by others are all reasons I’m drawn to attend and why CTI Digital was proud to be one of the sponsors.

The North West Drupal User Group Unconference last weekend was no exception in terms of inclusivity and our Drupal team were there in force.

Appnovation Technologies: Drupal Website Accessibility, Part 1: The problem, and why it matters…

Vie, 11/10/2017 - 06:00
Drupal Website Accessibility, Part 1: The problem, and why it matters… Drupal Website Accessibility, Part 1: The problem, and why it matters… "The power of the Web is in its universality.  Access by everyone regardless of disability is an essential aspect." - Sir Tim Berners-Lee, W3C, Director and Inventor of the World Wide Web In the coming weeks, I’ll be taking a look into one...

Red Route: Knowledge Is Dead, Long Live Learning

Vie, 11/10/2017 - 04:22

This article was originally posted on the Capgemini Engineering blog

There's a certain inescapable truth that people who work with technology need to face. As time goes by, the knowledge we’ve gained almost inevitably becomes obsolete. If we specialise in something, how do we deal with the fact that our specialism, which may even have been cutting edge technology that we were pioneering, eventually becomes a legacy system? As Ellen Ullman put it, "The corollary of constant change is ignorance ... we computer experts barely know what we are doing."

Front end developers are very familiar with this feeling, confronted so frequently with the dizzying pace of change in the world of JavaScript frameworks. Once upon a time, I was very proud of my ability to make CSS layouts work in IE7. Now all those tricks and hacks are little more than worthless trivia, perhaps less valuable than actual trivia. At least knowing who scored the winner in the 1973 FA Cup final might help in a pub quiz - I can't imagine that being able to prefix properties with an asterisk will ever come in handy, but it's taking up storage space in my brain. Now that CSS grid is becoming widespread, everything I've learned about floats (and even flexbox) is becoming less and less useful. There are even some people (although I'm not one of them) who would say that CSS itself no longer has value. Similarly, jQuery is already on its way to joining YUI and MooTools in the graveyard of things I used to know about, and experienced members of the Drupal community have recently been coming to terms with the fact that in order for the technology to progress, we'll have to unlearn some of our old ways.

It isn't just true for technology. London taxi drivers are finding that their hard-earned Knowledge is being made obsolete by satnav, and before too long, the skill of driving will itself have gone the way of basket weaving or being able to pilot a horse-drawn buggy - something that might still be interesting for the enthusiast, but isn’t relevant to most people’s lives.

Confronted with the unpleasant reality that our hard-learned skills are becoming outdated, what's the appropriate response? Do we follow the example of the Luddites and rage against the evolution of the machines? It's easy to fall victim to the sunk costs fallacy, and ego provides a strong temptation to hang on to our guru status, even if we're experts in an area that is no longer useful. If you're a big fish in a shrinking pond, you may need to be careful that your pond doesn't dry up entirely. Besides, do you really want to work on legacy systems? Having said that, if your legacy system is still mission-critical somewhere, and migrating away would be a big job, there's good money to be made - just ask the people working on COBOL.

I think there's a healthier way of looking at this. With the internet acting as a repository of knowledge, and calculators at our fingertips, education is evolving. There's no longer much value in memorising times tables, or knowing the date of the battle of Culloden. As my colleague Sarah Saunders has written, you're never too old to learn, but the value of learning things is greater than the value of the facts or skills that we learn - the meta-skill of learning is the really useful thing. Then again, I would say that, having done a philosophy degree.

For example, the time and effort I put into learning French and German at school doesn’t currently seem like a worthwhile investment, when I think about how frequently I use those languages. But I would never say that it was a waste of time. When I lived in Tokyo, having learned other languages definitely helped when it came to learning Japanese. Then again, these days I don’t often spend any time in Japan or with Japanese people, so the current value of that effort seems low. But do I regret spending that effort? Not a bit. It helped me to make the most of my life in Japan, and besides, it was interesting.

Two of the most compelling conference talks I've heard in the last few years touched on this theme from different directions. Andrew Clarke and Patrick Yua both emphasised the importance of focussing on the underlying principles, rather than chasing whatever the current new hotness might be. Designers and developers can learn something from Yves Saint Laurent: "Fashions fade, style is eternal".

We need to recognise that things will always keep changing. Perhaps we could help ourselves to acknowledge the impermanence of our skills by saying some kind of ceremonial goodbye to them. I have an absurd vision of a Viking funeral, where a blazing longboat sails away full of old O'Reilly books. We may not need to go that far, but we do need to remind ourselves that what we've learned has served us well, even if that knowledge is no longer directly applicable. A knowledge funeral could be an opportunity to mourn for the passing of a skill into obsolescence, and to celebrate the value of learning.

Image source: wikimedia

Tags:  learning development psychology Capgemini Drupal All tags

Morpht: Announcing Entity Class Formatter for Drupal 8

Vie, 11/10/2017 - 01:06

The Entity Class Formatter is a nifty little module which allows editors to place classes on to entities, allowing their look and feel to be altered in the theme layer or with other modules such as Look and Modifiers. It is now available for Drupal 8.

Entity Class Modifier is a humble little module, however, it does open up a lot of possibilities. The most obvious is to use the theme layer to provide styles for the class which has been applied. This makes it possible for the “designer” at design time to can some different styles to pick from. It is however, possible to use the module in a more flexible way and combine it with Modifiers and Looks.

Once a class has been defined and added to a field, a “Look Mapping” can be defined, associating the class with a set of Modifiers. The site builder or skilled editor can then go in and define any number of Modifiers which will be fired with the class.

For example - a “my-awesome-class” class could be created which is wired into a “field_my_awesome” set of Modifiers. The Modifiers could include a blue linear gradient with white text overlay with generous padding. All of this configuration happens in the UI after deploy. It is a very flexible and powerful system. The system can be configured after deployment and adapted to the styles you wish to apply.

Basic use of Entity Class Formatter

The use of the module is very easy. We can for example define our own class on the article.

The first thing we need to do is to enable the module. Once installation is complete we can go and add our custom field. In this little tutorial we will basically add the class onto the article content type. So go to Structure > Content types > Article > Manage fields and add new text field. We can name the field simply "Class" and save it. As we keep everything in default we can save it on the next page too.

 

Now the last thing we need to do to make it work is set the Entity Class on the field in Manage display page. Go to Structure > Content types > Article > Manage display and change the format to "Entity Class". There's no need to any other manipulation with field because it won't render any values which would be visible to the visitor of the page.

 

That's it! No we can go to create an article (Content > Add content > Article). Input class to our field...

... voila, class is there!

Similar but different

There are a couple of modules out there which are similar but are different enough for them not to be totally suited to our requirements.

Classy Paragraphs, available in Drupal 8, has been influential in the Paragraphs ecosystem and has opened the way for creative designs. It was intended to apply to Paragraphs only and is quite structured in the way classes are applied through a custom field type. The Entity Class Formatter module is more flexible in that it has been designed to apply to all entity types. It can also handle a variety of field types (text, select lists, entity references) and is able to adapt to the data at hand. So, Entity Class Formatter has a similar aim - it is just somewhat more generic.

Field Formatter CSS Class, available in Drupal 7, also uses a field formatter approach to applying the class to the entity. It does have more complexity than this module because it deals with several layers of nesting. The Entity Class Formatter is very simple and only applies to the parent entity of the field.

Entity Class Formatter was inspired by Classy Paragraphs (thanks) and is supported by the team at Morpht.

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: Drupal con Vienna’ session about business

Jue, 11/09/2017 - 23:11
Nowadays business in a complex and dynamic environment. Because of its uncertainness, it's never too late to listen to a good lecture. If you have missed any session from DrupalCon Vienna, let us highlight some of them to you.    Co-operative Drupal: Growth & Sustainability through Worker Ownership Finn Lewis, Technical Director of Agile Collective Ltd   There is an increasing number of worker-owned Drupal companies. So there are more and more sectors looking for effective and customizable software solutions, so it's a good time to start or grow Drupal's business, which is not… READ MORE

Acquia Developer Center Blog: Optional Config Weirdness in Drupal 8

Jue, 11/09/2017 - 18:24

Ah, the config system. Crown jewel of Drupal 8, amirite?

Well, yeah, it’s fantastic and flexible (as is most of Drupal). But if you have advanced use cases — such as building a system that alters config dynamically — there are traps you should know about.

Tags: acquia drupal planet

Stanford Web Services Blog: BADCamp 2017: Caryl’s Training Recap

Jue, 11/09/2017 - 16:14

BADCamp is a delightful mix of networking and educational opportunities. Along with connecting with former acquaintances and meeting new people, I attended two really informative trainings. Here’s my recap:

Acquia Lightning Blog: Optional config weirdness in Drupal 8

Jue, 11/09/2017 - 15:55
Optional config weirdness in Drupal 8 phenaproxima Thu, 11/09/2017 - 12:55

This post was originally published on Medium.

Ah, the config system. Crown jewel of Drupal 8, amirite?

Well, yeah, it’s fantastic and flexible (as is most of Drupal). But if you have advanced use cases — such as building a system that alters config dynamically — there are traps you should know about.

Config is normally a fairly static thing. Your module/theme/profile (“extension” from here on out) has some configuration in its config/install sub-directory, and when the extension is installed, that config is imported. Once it’s imported, that config is owned by your site and you can change it in any way you see fit.

That’s the simplest, and most common, use case in a nutshell. Let’s talk about some other ones.

Optional config

In some extensions’ config directory, you will see an ‘optional’ directory alongside ‘install’. If you look in there, you see…some YAML files. What’s all this, then?

Optional config is normal config, but it’s treated differently. When an extension is installed, each piece of optional config it provides is analyzed, then imported only if all of its dependencies are fulfilled. A piece of config can declare, for example, that it depends on a view called ‘content’. That’d be expressed thusly in code:

dependencies: config: - views.view.content

If that piece of config is optional, then it will only be imported if, well, a view called ‘content’ exists in the system. That view might have been shipped with another extension, or maybe you created it manually. It makes no difference. As long as a view called ‘content’ is present, any optional config that depends on it will be imported as well.

Neat, yes? This comes in quite handy for something like Lightning, which allows you to create an install profile which “extends” Lightning, yet only installs some of Lightning’s components. Optional config allows us to ship config that might be imported, depending on what parts of Lightning you have chosen to install. Hooray for flexibility!

Optional config whilst installing Drupal

But wait, there’s more.

When you’re doing a full site installation (i.e., install.php or drush site-install), optional config is treated a little bit differently. In such a case, all extensions are installed as normal, but their optional config is ignored initially. Then, at the end of the installation process1, once all extensions are installed (and their default config has been imported), all2 the optional config is imported in a single batch.

I don’t think this is documented anywhere, but it can have major ramifications. Consider this piece of code — let’s say it’s part of a module called fubar, which provides some default config and some optional config. This hook will be invoked while fubar is being installed, but after its default config has been imported:

<?php /** * Implements hook_install(). */ function fubar_install() { $view = entity_load('view', 'fubar_view'); $view->setDescription('The force will be with you, always.'); $view->save(); }

fubar_view is optional config, so will entity_load() return a view entity, or will it return NULL? What do you think?

The maddening answer is it depends. It depends on when fubar is being installed. If Drupal is already installed, and you’re just adding fubar to your site, then $view will be a view entity, because the optional config will be imported before hook_install() is invoked. But if you’re installing fubar as part of a full site install — as part of an installation profile, say — $view is going to be NULL, because optional config is imported in a single batch at the end of the installation process, long after all hook_install() implementations have been invoked.

Yeah, it’s a WTF, but it’s a justifiable one: trying to resolve the dependencies of optional config during Drupal’s install process would probably have been a colossal, NP-complete nightmare.

Dynamically altering optional config

So let’s say you need to make dynamic alterations to optional config. You can’t do it in hook_install(), because you can’t be sure that the config will even exist in there. How can you do it?

The easiest thing is not to make assumptions about when the config will be available, but simply react when it is. If the optional config you’re trying to alter is an entity of some sort, then you can simply use entity hooks! Continuing our fubar example, you could add this to fubar.module:

<?php use Drupal\views\ViewEntityInterface; /** * Implements hook_ENTITY_TYPE_presave(). */ function fubar_view_presave(ViewEntityInterface $view) { if ($view->isNew() && $view->id() == 'fubar_view') { $view->setDescription('Do, or do not. There is no try.'); } }

This ensures that fubar_view will contain timeless Yoda wisdom, regardless of whether fubar_view was imported while installing Drupal. If fubar_view is created at the end of the installation process, no problem — the hook will catch it and set the description. On the other hand, if fubar_view is installed during drush pm-enable fubar, the hook will…catch it and set the description. It works either way. It’s fine to dynamically alter optional config, but don’t assume it will be available in hook_install(). Simply react to its life cycle as you would react to any other entity’s. Enjoy!

Moar things for your brain
  • hook_install() can never assume the presence of optional config…but it can assume the presence of default config (i.e., the stuff in the config/install directories). That is always imported before hook_install() is invoked.
  • In fact, you can never depend on the presence of optional config. That’s why it’s optional: it might exist, and it might not. That’s its nature! Remember this, and code defensively.
  • The config_rewrite module, though useful, can throw a monkey wrench into this. Due to the way it works, it might create config entities, even optional ones, before hook_install() is invoked. Even during the Drupal installation process. Beware! (They are, however, working to fix this.)
  • The config system is well-documented. Start here and here. This post is only one of tons of other blog posts about config in D8.
  • This blog post came about because of this Lightning issue. So hats off to Messrs. mortenson and balsama.
  • Thanks to dawehner for reviewing this post for technical accuracy.
  • “NP-complete”, as I understand it, is CompSci-ese for “unbelievably hard to solve”. Linking to the Wikipedia article makes me seem smarter than I really am.

1 The reason this happens at the end is because any number of things could be changing during installation (who knows what evil lurks in hook_install()? Not even the Shadow knows), and and trying to solve multiple dependency chains while everything is changing around you is like trying to build multiple castles on a swamp. (Only one person has ever accomplished it.) Don't think about this stuff too much, or it will melt your brain.

2 “All”, in this case, means “all the optional config with fulfilled dependencies,” not all-all.

Amazee Labs: GraphQL for Drupalers - the basics

Jue, 11/09/2017 - 14:25
GraphQL for Drupalers - the basics

GraphQL is becoming more and more popular every day. Now that we have a beta release of the GraphQL module (mainly sponsored and developed by Amazee Labs) it's easy to turn Drupal into a first-class GraphQL server. This is the new GraphQL series in which we'll describe the features that are new in beta and provide a detailed overview of the integration with Drupal's entity and field systems.

Blazej Owczarczyk Thu, 11/09/2017 - 17:25

This is the new GraphQL series about the new features that are in beta (published 2 weeks ago) and how they are connected with Drupal out of the box

The modules

Let's start with the modules we need. Recently there were quite a few changes in this field. In alpha we had:

  • graphql - The main module laying the foundations for exposing data using Drupal plugins.
  • graphql_core - which exposed Drupal core data - the info about entity types and bundles, but not fields
  • graphql_content - which handled field exposition with the view modes
  • other auxiliary modules (e.g., graphql_boolean graphql_entity_reference) that provided behaviours for specific field types

In beta, the structure has changed. Now the default schema exposes all the Drupal fields and (content) entities in raw form, using the typed data. Thanks to that GraphQL became a zero-configuration plug and play module. We just need to enable graphql and graphql_core (the only two modules that are shipped with the package now) and we're good to go.

NOTE: The other modules are still available in case you need them, they're just not part of the core package anymore. graphql_legacy is where most of the field modules went. Besides that, there are graphql_views  which lets us expose views, the promising graphql_twig that allows using GraphQL queries without a decoupled setup and a few more. All of the modules are listed in the drupal-graphql organization page on GitHub.

The Explorer

After enabling graphql and graphql_core we can go ahead and test it with GraphiQL; an interactive tool that lets you run queries, see results in real time and preview all the available fields along with arguments and return types. It also provides query validation, autocompletes suggestions and keyboard shortcuts. Thus, it's a kind of an IDE. The explorer is connected with the schema. We can find it next to the Default Schema under: Configuration -> Web services -> GraphQL -> Schemas or using the direct path - graphql/explorer.

This is how it looks. On the left, there is a query box with a comment describing the tool and listing the keyboard shortcuts. Results show up in the box on the right. To run the query we can use the «play» button at the top, or the keyboard shortcut (Ctrl-Enter). One more important piece is the < Docs button in the upper right corner. This is where we can see all the available elements. Let's go ahead and click it.

The only thing we can start with is the query field which is of type RootQuery. Clicking on the type shows a list of available sub-fields, including userById, which looks like this:

This field takes two arguments: an id (which is a string) and a language (which can be set to any language enabled on the site) and is of type User. Clicking on the type brings up a list of fields on a user. The name is a string:

Strings are scalars (which means they don't have subfields) so we can finish our simple query here. It will look like this:

and (after running it with Ctrl-enter) the response is what we'd expect

The GraphQL explorer (or GraphiQL) gives us the ability to easily write and debug every GraphQL query. That's a feature that's hard to overestimate so getting familiar with it is a good starting point to understanding how GraphQL works in general and how we can get our Drupal data out of it.

The Voyager

Voyager is another schema introspection tool, a visual one this time. It draws a chart of all the types and field in the system and presents it in a nice way. It can be found next to The Explorer under: Configuration -> Web services -> GraphQL -> Schemas or using the direct path - graphql/voyager.

That's it for this post. In the next one, we'll see some examples of retrieving data from Drupal fields.

 

Texas Creative: Drupal 8 Custom Table of Contents Block for Book Content

Jue, 11/09/2017 - 14:15

Want to customize the default block that comes with the book module?  Here’s a way to do it without writing custom code by using Views and the Views Tree module.

Read More

Aten Design Group: Sunshine, Rainbows and Release Cycles: Drupal 9 and Beyond

Jue, 11/09/2017 - 13:57
Planning for Drupal 9 and Beyond

Justin’s recent post about the product approach and Drupal's new release cycle got me thinking about what upgrading to Drupal 9 will really look like from a more technical standpoint. There's already lots of information out there explaining this new feature. I think there are some misconceptions about what it means for Drupal projects though, so let’s take a little look under the hood.

Background

To understand what the process of updating to Drupal 9 might look like, you'll need to know a few background terms. If you already know what "semver" and "deprecation" mean for a software project, you can skip ahead to "Preparing for Drupal 9".

Drupal now follows semantic versioning. Semantic versioning—semver for short—is a format for assigning numbers to releases. This number signals a promise about the compatibility and/or stability of a release. A semver tag has three parts, a major version number, a minor version number and a patch version number, all separated by periods. For example, a recent version of Drupal was tagged 8.4.0. For this release, the major version number was 8; the minor version number is 4; the patch number is 0. A common misconception is to think that after 8.0.9, one must have 8.1.0, but it’s perfectly acceptable to have a release number like 8.0.107.

What do major, minor and patch mean? We'll look at each from least to most significant.

A patch release signifies a fix.

They are usually composed of small, isolated fixes. When Drupal is on version 8.4.0 and releases version 8.4.1, this indicates that it is a patch release. It means, "nothing in your code needs to change, we just fixed some bugs". These might be security fixes, so you should update to these releases as soon as possible.

A minor release signifies new features and deprecations.

These are my favorite. They're the ones filled with all the sunshine and rainbows. A minor release adds new features and code to Drupal. This might mean an experimental module becomes stable as the Workflow module did in 8.4.0 or—my personal favorite—a new experimental module, like JSON API, might be added to Core. A minor release is an opportunity for Drupal's maintainers to clean things up, to keep Drupal fresh and to ensure Drupal keeps up with the needs of modern applications. It's also an opportunity to deprecate parts of Drupal Core. A deprecation is when a part of Drupal Core gets moved to the graveyard. It will be maintained for security fixes and bugs, but you shouldn't use that part of Drupal any more. It's usually an indication that there are new, better APIs or best-practices you should follow. A minor release says, "we've made things better, we've cleaned stuff up, and we didn't break your stuff yet."

The graveyard of deprecated APIs

A major release signifies incompatible changes.

They can be a cause for celebration or an ominous cloud on the horizon. They're a critical event in Drupal's lifecycle. A major release is a signal that says "Warning: Your Stuff Might Break!" In some software, it might mean you need to rebuild your project. In Drupal 8 and beyond, thankfully, this shouldn't be the case. The maintainers have made a promise that says, "if you're not using deprecated code, you can update without rebuilding." In the past, like from Drupal 6 to Drupal 7, that wasn't the case and things definitely broke.

Preparing for Drupal 9

So, you know what a deprecation is, and what a major version release means. You know that the promise of Drupal's new release cycle is "if you're not using deprecated code, you can update without breaking things." But did you catch the caveat? If you're not using deprecated code. It's here that I believe the most misconceptions lie. I believe that many have confused this promise to mean that projects can be updated to Drupal 9 without a hitch. That the upgrade will be relatively routine.

The truth is that it's really up to you to make it routine and not something to fear.

How you approach your Drupal software project means that this major event in Drupal's lifecycle can be either a midlife crisis or a coming-of-age.

I said earlier that all the sunshine and rainbows are in the minor version releases. That's because you get all the goodies for free. Underneath the hood though, you need to be aware of what's being deprecated. Every time something is deprecated, a little technical debt is added to your project. You should pay that debt as soon as possible. A deprecation is a warning that the code underneath is going to disappear in Drupal 9. It's a warning to module maintainers and project developers that they need to update code that relies upon that newly deprecated API.

This reality is another point in the product approach's favor, as we alluded to in our earlier post. By making an ongoing investment in your project, you can address these deprecations as they happen so that when you're ready to upgrade to Drupal 9, it will be as painless as any other update.

The Prettiest Rainbows Come After a Little Rain

A select few sites will be able to proudly announce their upgrades to Drupal 9 the day it's released or soon after. Many won’t be able to move so quickly.

Knowing that Drupal 9 will break things relying on deprecated code and knowing that many modules won’t have been updated ahead of the release (such is life in open source), many sites will have to be patient. How patient depends on whether they’ve made an ongoing investment in their platform and kept up with deprecations in their custom code. They’ll be able to upgrade even faster if they have been model citizens in the Drupal community by reporting—and hopefully fixing—contrib dependencies on deprecated code too.

So, is this just like every other major Drupal release? Absolutely not! Gone forever are the days of completely rebuilding your site with every major update. Gone are the days of needing to migrate your own content to your own site. What this means is that you’ll just have to sit inside and wait or go play in the rain, fixing some bugs and updating some outdated dependencies, before you get to enjoy the Drupal 9 rainbow.

Here are some helpful links to stay up to date with deprecations:

Morpht: Announcing Webform Mass Email port for Drupal 8

Jue, 11/09/2017 - 07:57

The Webform Mass Email module has now been ported to Drupal 8. Time to get emailing :)

The Webform module has long been a powerhouse for Drupal site builders, providing a flexible solution to one of the central problems of web development: collecting user data, storing it and notifying users when content is added. the Webform module has been extended in many directions, supporting ancillary workflows and use cases.

One such use case is sending a mass email to all subscribers to a Webform. This can be handy for when users are signing up to an event or have registered their interest in a topic. The Webform Mass Email module fills this gap.

The module works as follows

When installed, Webform Mass Email module adds a new sub-tab called "Mass Email" under all Webform's "Results" tab (next to "Submissions", "Download" and "Clear") and one settings sub-tab called "Mass Emails" under global Webform "Configuration" tab (next to "Exporters", "Libraries" and "Advanced").

  1. Site builder navigates to the "Mass Emails" tab and set base module settings once.
    • "Cron time" - How much time is being spent per cron run (in seconds).
    • "Allow sending as HTML" - If checked, all emails are processed as HTML formatted.
    • "Log emails" - Should the emails be logged to the system log at admin/reports/dblog?
  2. The site builder can then assign "Send Webform Mass Email" permission for roles which are able to send mass emails.
  3. Anyone with this permission can then navigate to the "Mass Email" sub-tab of any Webform and send messages.
    • "Email field" - The field that is going to be used as the recipient's email address.
    • "Subject" - Message subject for your email.
    • "Body" - Message text for your email.
  4. After you hit the "Send emails" button, messages are inserted into queue and sent when cron is running.

The module has now been ported to Drupal 8 and is being supported by the team at Morpht. Check it out and let us know what you think.
 

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