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OpenSense Labs: Blazing fast websites with Gatsby and Decoupling Drupal

Vie, 01/04/2019 - 05:01
Blazing fast websites with Gatsby and Decoupling Drupal Shankar Fri, 01/04/2019 - 12:31

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s ultra-modernist novel about jazz-age America, The Great Gatsby, has been regarded as one of the best books ever written. It has fascinated the readers by creating a sort of aftermath of wonder. Enter the digital age, there is another ‘Gatsby’ which is getting a wondrous reception and is in the reckoning for being a great tool when it comes to web development.


The emergence of the static site generation, where views are rendered in advance for mitigating the burden on APIs and other backend systems, is proving to be a remarkable solution for great web performance. Gatsby, as a static site generator, can dramatically metamorphose the web performance. It can be a magnificent option in combination with Drupal as the backend for building an enriching single page applications.

No wonder Kyle Mathews, the founder of GatsbyJS, tweeted in 2017:


GatsbyJS: Explained Gatsby Usage Statistics | Source: BuiltWith

Currently, GatsbyJS is on the rise when it comes to its usage as can be seen in the graph above. So, what is it? GatsbyJS, an open source static site generator, stitches together the best of ReactJS, Webpack, routing, GraphQL and other front-end tools into one very enjoyable developer experience.


Gatsby leverages powerful pre-configuration for developing a website. It has out-of-the-box capabilities for spectacularly fast page loads, data prefetching, asset optimisation, code splitting, server-side rendering, service workers, and intelligent image loading.

Features of Gatsby Source: Gatsbyjs.org

Following are the reasons that should be considered while choosing Gatsby:

Well-architected plugin system

With Gatsby, content is written as React components and is rendered at build time to the Document Object Model (DOM) as static HTML, CSS and JavaScript files. With a rich data plugin ecosystem, the static content rendered can be sourced from a plethora of sources and formats constituting markdown, CSV (Comma-separated values), and from content management systems (CMS) like Drupal.

Magnificent Scalability

Gatsby can scale to the entire internet as it builds the site as static files that can be deployed with ease on numerous services. It helps in letting go of intricate deploys involving databases and servers, their time-intensive setup costs, maintenance among others.

Performance and Progressive Web Apps out-of-the-box

Gatsby enforces best practices and optimises your site by default. When the build process runs, static HTML files are created for individual pages to offer swift initial load times.

When the page is loaded by the browser, Gatsby boots up React and navigates around your site as if you were navigating through a single page application with near-instant transitions without page reloads.

Gatsby prefetches adjacent/related page content in the background which nullifies any chances of delay when the user clicks on a link. The client-side experience is awesome with JavaScript enabled as there is no loss of content or navigation if the user has JavaScript disabled.

Gatsby can offer offline support as well with the addition of a single plugin thereby making your site into a full-blown progressive web app (PWA).

JAMstack setup

A paradigm shift has been occurring in the web development arena with JAMstack setup taking the centre stage. The amalgamation of client-side JavaScript, reusable APIs, and prebuilt Markup is the future of web development. Gatsby can be a stupendous JavaScript framework for a JAMstack-powered web application.

Merits of Integrating Gatsby and Drupal

Drupal is great for its provision of intricate page layouts or content modelling with numerous sections per page. It is an amazing solution for the teams with multi-stage content creation and assessment processes. Decoupled Drupal is an astounding solution for building enterprise-grade websites and has the deep-rooted support of Drupal Community leaders. 

Leveraging the benefits of Drupal with Gatsby is an amazing approach towards getting an enterprise-level CMS for free in addition to modern development experience and the merits of JAMstack such as security, scalability and performance. One of the great examples of implementation of decoupled Drupal and Gatsby can be seen through the demo site of Umami Food Magazine which is powered by Contenta CMS, headless Drupal distribution, and GatsbyJS.

Incorporating Gatsby in a decoupled Drupal setup enables you to access the impressive content architecture and access workflow capabilities of Drupal 8 in addition to the splendid UI creation and performance toolset of Gatsby. Moreover, both Drupal and Gatsby are open source, have a huge and active community presence and a wonderful ecosystem of add-on modules or plugins. To add to that, the built-in web services of Drupal 8 streamlines the integration process.

Demonstration


To integrate Gatsby to a new or existing Drupal site, gatsby-source-drupal plugin is added to the Gatsby site. Gatsby-source-drupal plugin is a source plugin that is used to pull data into Gatsby from Drupal sites and it does so with the help of JSON:API module. It is followed by configuration of the plugin with your Drupal credentials and hosted URL. You can, then, access the Drupal data with the help of GraphQL queries.

A digital agency exhibited a demonstration that pulls Drupal content into a Gatsby site. It had a Drupal 8 site already installed and created a content type named Coffee with three fields: Title, Body and Image. Drupal was made into an API server with the installation of JSON:API and JSON:API Extras modules. For accessing the JSON API resource list, anonymous user permission was given.

This was followed by building process of Gatsby site called coffees.gatsby by making sure that the node and npm are installed on the computer. Then, the content was fetched from the Drupal server. For this, a simple page was created to display all the coffee types from the Drupal site.

Then, gatsby_source_drupal plugin was used to read Drupal content from the default endpoint /jsonapi. GraphQL was utilised to query all the coffee nodes from Drupal. Finally, the Gatsby site was published by simply copying or pushing contents in /public to the server.

Conclusion

Gatsby is an incredible static site generator that streamlines the process of creating blazing fast websites. Gatsby extracts data from sources like Drupal and then uses that data for generating static pages at build time. The data sourced from numerous backends can even be merged. This technique helps in extracting the benefits of both static sites like speed, ease of deployment etc. and the content management systems like the easy update process, user-friendly editorial interface etc.

Coming together of Drupal and Gatsby renders incredibly fast static pages and then merges that with traditional React for user authentication and personalisation.

We are committed to the provision of ambitious digital experiences with our expertise in Drupal development.

Contact us at hello@opensenselabs.com to get the most out of Drupal + Gatsby integration.

blog banner blog image GatsbyJS Gatsby Decoupling Drupal ReactJS React Drupal 8 Drupal GraphQL JAMstack Progressive Web Application Progressive Web App PWA Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On

Agaric Collective: <div class="flow_middle">

Jue, 01/03/2019 - 17:14

Former school teacher turned technologist, Clayton now applies his background in linguistics, community organizing and web development as a user experience architect for Agaric and co-founder of Drutopia.

Clayton has worked with universities, open source companies, tech diversity advocates, prison abolitionists, and others to translate their organizational goals into impactful digital tools with meaningful content.

Aside from content strategy and information architecture, Clayton also enjoys… Read more

Agaric Collective: <div class="flow_middle">

Jue, 01/03/2019 - 17:14

David has been doing web development for 12 years now and Drupal development for the last 6. In his early days as programmer he read about the Free Software movement and immediately wanted to be part of it.

He started contributing to different free software projects but the majority of his work has been made for Drupal, as a core contributor and helping to fix and improve some contrib… Read more

Agaric Collective: <div class="flow_middle">

Jue, 01/03/2019 - 17:14

Mauricio Dinarte is a passionate Drupal developer, consultant, and trainer with over 7 years of web development experience. After completing his BS in Computer Science, graduating with the highest GPA among 181 students, he completed a Masters in Business Administration.

Mauricio started his Drupal journey in 2011 and fell in love with Drupal right away. Through the years, he has worked on projects of large scale playing different roles such as site builder, themer, module developer, and… Read more

Agaric Collective: <div class="flow_middle">

Jue, 01/03/2019 - 17:14

Micky is involved in the “free software for community building” movement and the Platform Cooperativism movement. She helps Agaric's work contribute back to these movements. She also handles some administrative tasks, public outreach, and support as part of the team.

Micky is a worker/owner of Agaric and a member of the “free software for community building” movement - using tools like VOIP, Drupal, and GNU/Linux. She is liaison between the US Solidarity Economy Network (SEN) a group devoted to ongoing dialog on… Read more

Agaric Collective: <div class="flow_middle">

Jue, 01/03/2019 - 17:14

Benjamin lives and works to connect people, ideas, and resources so more awesome things happen.

A web developer well-established with Drupal and PHP, he has also been enjoying programming projects with Django and Python. His work with Agaric clients has included universities (MIT and Harvard University), corporations (Backupify and GenArts), and not-for-profit organizations (Partners In Health and National Institute for Children's Health Quality). After ten years in the internet technology,… Read more

Droptica: How did we help to double mobile sales in a Drupal Commerce store?

Jue, 01/03/2019 - 10:50
At Droptica, we designed, made and implemented a new design of an online store for mobile devices for one of the oldest publishers in Poland. We used Drupal 7 Commerce and did some search engine optimisation. The results? Increased sales.

ARREA-Systems: Hook form with build validate and submit

Jue, 01/03/2019 - 06:18
Hook form with build validate and submit

Context

EK application has a module that store personal documents for user. When user account is deleted, those documents may be transferred to another account.

To achieve that, we need to alter the user account cancel form when building the form, validating and submitting it.

Let's review the 3 steps.

 

BUILD

The form before altering it looks like this

We need to add a field to select another user account to which the document of the canceled account will be moved to.

To achieve that we Implements hook_form_alter() in MyModule.module:

OpenSense Labs: Leaping forward with Drupal and React

Jue, 01/03/2019 - 05:42
Leaping forward with Drupal and React Shankar Thu, 01/03/2019 - 13:12

Digital transformation is at the helm of every enterprise to keep up with the rapid technological advancements. The New York Times, a leading international news media, leads by example in such changing times. It is not just known for its premium content but also for the astronomical presence both in the print and the digital medium. React has been at the forefront of its digital evolution to make its site faster and easier to use for both the readers and the developers alike.


Large organisations like the New York Times are leaping forward with their inclination towards best-of-breed web technologies like React. Any front-end technology React would require a RESTful service-based backend for storing data and implementing business logic. This is where Drupal makes a big impact with its RESTful services that are built into its core. Before we move onto the exploration of the amazing duo of Drupal and React, let’s explore React.

React: The Incipiency

The first signs of React can be traced back to 2010 as stated by RisingStack. React kicked off as a JavaScript port of XHP which was introduced by Facebook into its PHP stack and was open sourced. XHP majorly accounted for reducing cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks.

React was introduced in 2013 and was made open source.

The biggest obstacle with XHP was that dynamic web applications needed numerous round trips to the server which could not be achieved by XHP. This paved the way for ReactJS. FaxJS was the early prototype of React which came into the limelight in 2011. Ultimately, in 2013, React was introduced and open sourced.

Since then, React has swiftly gone on to become a popular choice (as can be seen in the graph below) because of its declarative style and the dearth of assumptions about your tech stack. Today, React has a large ecosystem comprising of top-of-the-line libraries, conferences and jacked-up demand for developers with React skills.

React Usage Statistics | Source: BuiltwithThe World of React React is a JavaScript library for building user interfaces - reactjs.org


ReactJS is a JavaScript library created by a Facebook engineer named Jordan Walke. It is a declarative and a component-based solution for building web applications. It is great for the following reasons:

Provision of declarative views

With its declarative views, your code becomes simpler and foretellable while debugging thereby allowing you to develop interactive UIs and design streamlined views for each state in your application. In case of any alterations in the data, React can let you efficaciously update and render the right components.

Facilitation of writing components

Passing rich data through your app and keeping the state out of the Document Object Model (DOM) is possible as the component logic is written in JavaScript instead of templates. React helps in creating encapsulated components for managing their own state which can, then, be composed for making intricate user interfaces.

Focused and easy-to-learn

Unlike Angular or Vue.js, ReactJS is a library and not a full-featured framework. It emphasises on one thing and doing it properly. It is consistently leveraged in association with other JavaScript libraries. So, there is a shorter learning curve vis-à-vis understanding React in comparison to other comprehensive libraries. It does not assume anything about your existing tech stack which helps in developing new features in React without having to rewrite existing code.

React for mobile app development

React Native is advantageous for its portability and the ability to reuse components, real-time reload and modular architecture, open source and generous ecosystem.

React + Drupal

As an open source content management system, Drupal has witnessed a staggering growth over the years (as can be seen in the graph below). It offers a magnificent suite of tools for data modelling, editorial workflow implementation and the coding custom application logic. It has spectacular support for JSON API or GraphQL web services which makes it a splendid choice as the backend for a React application.

Drupal Usage statistics | Source: Builtwith

Whether few of the elements on an existing web page has to be enhanced or a fully decoupled single page application needs to be created, the duo of Drupal and React can do it all. Implementation of Drupal and React together can be performed with a fully decoupled or headless approach; and progressively decoupled approach.

Decoupled or Headless Drupal with React

With the powerful web APIs, Drupal simplifies the creation of headless applications. Several lighthouse applications have been created with Drupal as the backend and powerful demo systems and starter kits like Reservoir and Contenta have burst onto the scene.

In a headless approach, Drupal is leveraged as the backend for a frontend application built in React. Usually, headless applications are utilised for showing content and the editing of content is still done in the backend. But React can also be used for the creation of wonderful editorial experience. With Drupal’s powerful REST APIs, integration of a decoupled editing system can be done. Drupal Europe 2018 had a session that demonstrated how to create an enterprise-level editorial experience for Drupal 8 with the help of React.


It exhibited a decoupled application with React that can let you edit content directly in the frontend. Leveraging React to the fullest, a modern editorial experience was created with in-place editing, context-sensitive editing, drag-and-drop content placement and creation and a lot more.

Progressively Decoupled Drupal with React

To strike a balance between editorial needs like layout management and developer’s desires, progressively decoupled Drupal allows you to interpolate a JavaScript framework into the Drupal front end.

OpenSense Labs has revamped the website of the Produce Market Guide (PMG), a resource for produce commodity information, fresh trends and data analysis, with help of progressively decoupled Drupal and React among others.


ElasticSearch Connector and Search API modules were utilised for the creation of mapping and indexing on Elastic Server. The development of Elastic backend architecture was followed by the building process of faceted search application with React and the integration of the app in Drupal as block or template page.

The project structure for the search was designed and developed in the sandbox with modern tools like Babel and Webpack and third-party libraries like Searchkit, which is a suite of React components that communicate directly with Elasticsearch cluster, turned out to be of great help with its fully customisable solution.

Logstash and Kibana, which are based on Elasticsearch, were integrated on the Elasticserver for collecting, parsing, storing and visualising the data. The app in the Sandbox was developed for the production and all the CSS/JS was incorporated inside the Drupal as a block thereby making it a progressively decoupled feature.

The project, that followed the principles of Agile and Scrum, resulted in a user-friendly website for PMG with a search application. It loaded the search results faster.

Conclusion

Drupal and React together can help enterprises to leap forward in the digital space. Drupal’s RESTful services-based backend and React with its amazing capabilities as the frontend can prove to be a remarkable solution.

We remain steadfast in our goals of fulfilling the digital transformation endeavours of our partners with our suite of services.

Contact us at hello@opensenselabs.com to build a Drupal website using React as the front-end technology.

blog banner blog image Drupal 8 ReactJS React JavaScript Headless Drupal Decoupled Drupal Progressively decoupled Drupal Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On

myDropWizard.com: We've made 99 Drupal 6 Long-Term Support releases... what does that mean for Drupal 7?

Jue, 01/03/2019 - 04:34

As you may or may not know, we've been providing Drupal 6 Long-Term Support (D6LTS) since February 24, 2016, as one of two vendors officially blessed by the Drupal Security Team to do so.

In that time, we have made 99 releases (both Drupal core and contrib) for D6LTS!

Most of those were security releases, but there were also a handful of bug fixes, and most recently, updates to support PHP 7.2(FYI: As of a couple days ago, PHP 5 has also reached it's End-of-Life (EOL) - do you have a plan to update to PHP 7.1 or 7.2?)

When we were first talking to potential customers about D6LTS, I remember many people doubting that we'd be releasing anything at all!

They'd say something like "Drupal 6 has been around so long, aren't all the security issues shaken out by now?" Almost 100 releases later, and I'd say there was plenty to be done. There still is! :-)

In this article, I'm going to look back on Drupal 6 LTS, and also look forward to what that may mean for Drupal 7 extended support after it reaches its End-of-Life.

Morpht: Drupal and Composer: Part 3 — Converting Management of an Existing Drupal 8 site to Composer

Jue, 01/03/2019 - 04:11

As any developer working with Drupal 8 knows, working with Composer has become an integral part of working with Drupal. This can be daunting for those without previous experience working with command line, and can still be a confusing experience for those who do.

This is the third post in an explorative series of blog posts on Drupal and Composer, hopefully clearing up some of the confusion. The four blog posts on this topic will be as follows:

If you have not yet read part 1 and part 2, then before reading through this post, it is probably best to ensure you understand the concepts outlined in the summaries of those articles.

Switching Management of your Drupal site to Composer

So you’ve worked your way through parts one and two of this series, and you now understand what Composer is, how it can be used to work with Drupal 8, and how to start a new Drupal 8 project using Composer. But, you started your current project without using Composer, and want to switch to managing your project using Composer. Where do you start? This article will discusses a few strategies behind converting your existing system to Drupal. Fortunately some automated tools exist for converting existing sites to Composer, and in the situation that neither of these tools work, an overview is provided on how to manually convert an existing site 

But, before moving on to any of these methods...

Take a backup! As this process will be destructive to your system, make sure you take a backup of your file system, and take a backup of your database. Then go and check to ensure that you have a full backup of the file system, and a full back up of the database.

If you skip this step, or do not do it properly, you may end up with an entirely broken system, so don’t skip this step.

Method 1: Composerize (Composer plugin)

Composerize Drupal is a Composer plugin that has been built to convert existing Drupal installations to use Composer. Instructions are on the download page. If this method doesn't work, you can try the Drupal Composerize module:

Method 2: Composerize (Drupal module)

The Composerize module is a Drupal module that is built to convert existing Drupal installations to use Composer. At the time of writing, this module has the following disclaimer on the page:

This module is still in development. It supports very basic Drupal 8 setups, but there are many necessary features it still lacks (e.g., support for patches, JavaScript libraries, distributions, etc). We're working on all that stuff, but this module is definitely not ready for prime time.

If this method doesn't work, you'll likely have to manually convert your site.

Method 3: Manual method

If the above steps fail, your last option is to convert your installation to using the Drupal Composer Template manually. Note that pretty much every system will be different, so these instructions are an overview of the end goal, rather than a complete set of steps that will convert your system. There is a good chance you’ll run into issues along the way that are not covered here, so make sure you took that backup!

Converting a system to the template requires achieving the following goals:

  • Setting up the file structure of the system to match the Drupal Composer Template
  • Delete old Composer files
  • Add the Template file system to your Drupal system
  • Set up the configuration directory and the private files directory
  • Set up your profiles, modules and themes to be managed by Composer
Step 1: Convert your file structure to match the Drupal Composer Template file structure

The Drupal Composer Template is set up to manage the directory above the webroot, as well as the webroot. The webroot is located in the [PROJECT ROOT]/web folder. Therefore you will need this structure:

  • / - Project root. Contains various scaffolding files such as composer.json and composer.lock, as well as the configuration export folder, and the webroot folder
    • /web - The webroot. Contains all Drupal core, profile, module and theme files.

You'll need to set up your Drupal installation to match this structure, and make sure that the server is set up so that the web root is at [PROJECT ROOT]/web.

Note: Some servers require the webroot to be in a directory with a specific name, such as public_html, or www. In this case, you can try setting up symlinks from the required directory name to the /web directory, so that, for example, [PROJECT ROOT]/public_html is a symlink pointing at [PROJECT ROOT]/web. Your Drupal files will then reside in the /web directory (satisfying the Drupal template), and also be accessible at /public_html (satisfying the server requirements). If this does not work, another option would be to edit the composer.json file (which is added in step 3) and change any paths that point at the /web directory, to point at the directory name you are actually using.

Step 2: Delete old Composer files

I'll say it again, because it needs to be said, make sure you took that backup in step 0!

If any of the following files or folders exist in your installation, delete them. Note however that you may want to save the composer.json file for reference if you've manually added any libraries into your existing installation using Composer.

  • [PROJECT ROOT]/vendor directory
  • [PROJECT ROOT]/composer.json file
  • [PROJECT ROOT]/composer.lock file
  • [PROJECT ROOT]/web/vendor directory
  • [PROJECT ROOT]/web/composer.json file
  • [PROJECT ROOT]/web/composer.lock file.
Step 3: Add the Template file system to your Drupal system

Go here, click 'clone or download' and download the .zip file (note - or clone the Git repository if you prefer)

  1. Save/move the zip file into the project root folder (the directory above the 'web' folder you created above). You can then unpack it using the following command. Before this step, the file /composer.json should not exist. After this step, if you've done it correctly, this file will exist.
    tar -zxvf [FILE] --strip-components=1
  2. Run the following command from the project root folder. This command will Install the Composer dependencies as well as create the /vendor directory.
    composer install
  3. Run the following to ensure your database is up to date, and caches are cleared.
    drush updb; drush cr;
Step 4: Set up the configuration directory and the private files directory (Optional)

This next step is optional, however it will make for a more secure system. First, the following directories need to be created if they don't already exist:

  • [PROJECT ROOT]/config/sync
  • [PROJECT_ROOT]/private

The first folder is where exports of the Drupal 8 configuration system will be exported to. The second folder is the private files folder. Creating both of these directories as siblings to the webroot adds security, as the files are not in a web-accessible location. The next thing to do is tell the system of the location of these files. This is done by declaring the folder paths in settings.php. You can do this by adding the following two lines to the bottom of settings.php:

$config_directories['sync'] = '../config/sync';
$settings['file_private_path'] = '../private';

After this, clear the registry (drush cr;). You can confirm that the configuration directory was properly set by running drush cex sync, and then checking that there are .yml files in the [PROJECT ROOT]/config/sync directory. You can confirm that the private files folder was properly set by going to Admin -> Configuration -> Media -> File System, and confirming that the private files directory is listed as ../private.

Step 5: Set up your profiles, modules and themes to be managed by Composer

The final step is to set up Composer to manage Drupal profiles, modules and themes to be managed by Composer. The Drupal Composer Template tracks Core by default, but needs to be informed of the rest of your code. Note that if you do not want to use the most recent version of these profiles/modules/themes, you will need to alter the commands below to set the version you want to install.

Drupal profiles, modules and themes can be installed with the following command:

composer require drupal/[PACKAGE NAME]

For example, if you were using the Administration Toolbar module (admin_toolbar), you would run:

composer require drupal/admin_toolbar

After you have done this, ensure you are up to date with a DB update and cache clear:

drush updb; drush cr;

At this point, your system should be converted to the Drupal Composer Template, with contributed code being managed by Composer.

Summary

This article looks at converting exiting Drupal 8 sites to being managed by the Drupal Composer Template. Doing this can potentially be automated using the Composerize Composer plugin or the Composerize Drupal module. In situations where this does not work, the manual directions in this article can be used as an alternative.

In the next and final part of this series, we'll look at how Drupal developers can integrate 3rd party libraries into their custom Drupal profiles, modules and themes.

Debug Academy: Annoucement: Drupal.tv - A new beginning for the Drupal community!

Mié, 01/02/2019 - 19:04
Author: Ashraf Abed

The Drupal we all know and love is evolving. The learning curve is shifting, the development paradigm is different, and the community, not only the software, is more ambitious. We felt it was time to build Drupal.tv as a thank you to the wider community. Drupal.tv is live as of January 1st, 2019!

Kevin Thull

From the community spotlight on Drupal.org: “He's the fellow that is dashing from room to room before the first session begins to set up the AV equipment and checking in with presenters making sure they all "push the red button". Because of him, we are all able attend the sessions we miss while busy elsewhere. He is personally responsible for recording over 800 sessions and donating countless hours of his time.”

Hear his thoughts on the unofficial Drupal recording initiative ( https://www.drupal.org/association/blog/introducing-the-unofficial-drupal-recording-initiative ).

Thank you, Kevin!

A Tweet to start it all

In Oct 2018, Rachel Lawson (@rachel_norfolk) tweeted: “It strikes me that creating a “DrupalTV” site, collating all YouTube session videos, would be possible in Drupal core these days. Tagging, searching, the lot. Could be a fun project? I’m sure one of our hosting providers would help…

As fate would have it, Ashraf Abed (@ashabed) of Debug Academy was looking for the upcoming semester’s class project and came across the tweet. Debug Academy always does a real, new project in class as it’s the best way to learn programming and to build credibility.

Yes, newbie Drupalers built this site.

Drupal’s learning curve is shifting. The focus of many ongoing core initiatives is improving developer experience, and not only for senior programmers.

This project was built (& continues to be built) by a team of new Drupal developers, led by one Acquia “Grand Master” certified Architect (Ashraf Abed, Debug Academy’s CEO).

The backgrounds of the team include (but are not limited to):

  • 4 experienced backend developers with 0 Drupal experience
  • 1 experienced front end developer with 0 Drupal experience
  • 2 self-taught web developers with 0 Drupal experience
    1. Former career: Library and Information Science
    2. Former career: Teacher (PHD in history!)
  • 2 self-taught with light site building experience in earlier versions of Drupal
  • 1 Drupal Grand Master / Architect (Ashraf)

To illuminate this a bit more: Ashraf was not allowed to contribute any code on the project during the semester, which ended on December 22nd, 2018 (1 week before this site’s launch). That is to ensure that the new developers gain proper experience building the project. So the majority of this project truly was built by non-Drupal developers. We’ll share more about those developers in an upcoming article, with their permission.

And if you’re thinking “the experienced backend developers did most of the work”, that simply is not the case. The majority of the work on the project was contributed by the rest of the group.

Furthermore, as is the naturally occurring case with most Debug Academy semesters, the development team was highly diverse. Over 70% of the team members come from backgrounds that tend to be minorities in our field, and we were lucky to benefit from their ideas and expertise. 

What’s now and what’s next?

Video Coverage

Kevin Thull provided us with a list of DrupalCamp videos, of which we’ve imported 100%. Thanks to Wendy Abed, Kevin, and Ashraf for importing the DrupalCamp and DrupalCon videos. We’re at over 3,500 videos!

In the near future, we will also add free Drupal training videos created by various providers. All videos on this website will always be free.

Conferences

You may have noticed some videos are tagged with conferences. In fact, all videos are tagged with conferences, but you can only see the published ones.

We ask DrupalCamp organizers to reach out so that they can populate their own conference pages. Debug Academy’s next cohort will built out the conference (meetups, Drupal Camps, Drupal Cons) functionality on the website to make conferences (past & future) easy to find.

Searching / Sorting / Filtering

The site’s search is powered by the Search API module(s). The plain text search actually works quite well - search for a conference name, a topic, etc, and you will find all videos from that conference/topic.

As part of next semester’s project, we will be tagging talks with topics and speakers, which will enable us to use faceted search on the website.

Wider accessibility

We want this site to be globally useful. We plan to import video captions as well as and enable the multilingual features available in Drupal core. And if you are recording Drupal conferences in your country, reach out to us with your youtube playlist!

Submitting videos

Video submissions are open to the public! Approved content administrators will have the ability to import entire playlists from youtube, but anyone can import an individual video! Anonymously submitted videos will be created as “Drafts”, and our team of alumni and approved moderators will approve appropriate videos (thanks, Drupal core content moderation!)

Ongoing maintenance

Debug Academy students and alumni will continue to build and maintain the website as a non-profit project for the Drupal community. We will periodically share articles about what new Drupal developers were able to build using the website.

After next semester’s project, we may reach a point where smaller Drupal Camp events do not need to create/maintain their own website. Instead, they could simply create a conference page on Drupal.tv and use their time on higher value initiatives, like running a great conference, as usual! :)

How can you help?

At the moment, we have plenty of development capacity for the project, and we would like this project to continue to enable graduates of Debug Academy to land their first full time jobs as Drupal developers. You can help by spreading the word!

Follow us on twitter @drupaldottv, sign up for our newsletter (in the footer) to hear about new videos and articles, and simply share this website to the wider Drupal community

Also, follow a few of the team members who helped create or populate the site: @kevinjthull, @ashabed, @jackg102@cotterpinx, and @DebugAcademy for sponsoring the project.

We'll be reaching out to our alumni to do a separate piece on them with their inputs and permission. We launched on New years, but it turns out that's an inconvenient time for many contributors. Who would've known?!

And I’d like to give a special shout out to the founder of Drupal, Dries Buytaert, for allowing us to use the domain drupal.tv for this project!

Happy new year, everyone!

TEN7 Blog's Drupal Posts: Episode 050: Dries Buytaert

Mié, 01/02/2019 - 18:20
In this our 50th episode, Ivan is joined by Dries Buytaert, the founder of Drupal, an open source software developer, a startup founder, technology executive, father, world traveler and photographer. Here's what we're discussing in this podcast: Dries' life and career; The creation and emergence of Drupal; Growing up in Antwerp; Living in Boston; Shared love for tennis; Yet another flying start with the Commodore 64; The power of copy/paste; Writing code for his father's medical practice; Wonka Vm, Linux and Java; Juggling multiple careers particularly fatherhood; DrupalCons; The MTV saga; TEN7's decision to go Drupal; The move from Belgium to Boston; Circumventing the globe; Benevolent Dictators for Life; Creating thousands of roles out of one; Drupal's Values and Principles; Drupal as a force for good in the world; Drupal's future and Dries' role moving ahead

iRolo.net: Using Lando with Multiple Databases

Mié, 01/02/2019 - 16:16

A lot of my work over the last few years has been working on migrations between various versions of Drupal. That usually means that I need to configure a local Drupal development environment with more than one database. And although this is relatively easy to do with Lando, I often have to look up how I did it before. So, I figured I should write it down and share with everyone else at the same time.

.lando.yml

Adding a database to an existing Lando environment is as easy as adding a few lines to the .lando.yml file and restarting.

services:
  legacy:
    type: mysql

This will create a new container called legacy with a MySQL database in it. Out of the box, Lando supports many common types of DB servers, including: MySQL, MariaDB, MongoDB, MSSQL, and PostgreSQL.

Often, your .lando.yml file might already have configuration in it. If the services line already exists, just put the new configuration underneath with the correct indentation. You can see examples of more complex configuration files at any of the links in the previous paragraph.

settings.php

Now, you will need to tell Drupal about the new DB. To do this, go to the command line and type lando info. In the output, you should see something like this:

{
  ...
  "legacy": {
    "type": "mysql",
    "version": "5.7",
    "hostnames": [
      "legacy",
      "legacy.clientname.internal"
    ],
    "creds": {
      "user": "mysql",
      "password": "password",
      "database": "database"
    },
    "internal_connection": {
      "host": "legacy",
      "port": 3306
    },
    "external_connection": {
      "host": "localhost",
      "port": "not forwarded"
    },
    "urls": []
  }
}

With that information, you can add the new DB configuration to Drupal's settings.php file.

$databases['old_db']['default'] = array (
  'database' => 'database',
  'username' => 'mysql',
  'password' => 'password',
  'prefix' => '',
  'host' => 'legacy',
  'port' => '3306',
  'namespace' => 'Drupal\\Core\\Database\\Driver\\mysql',
  'driver' => 'mysql',
);

Note that, by default the host name is going to correspond to the name of the service/container and will not necessarily be the same as the name of the database (or the name of the Drupal DB alias, for that matter). In other words, you should find the host and port values in Lando's internal_connection array. If, for some reason, you need to have a custom database name, credentials, port numbers or something else, you can refer to the links above.

Tags:

Agaric Collective: Drupal 8 Content Migration Training at DrupalCon Seattle

Mié, 01/02/2019 - 15:41
Drupal 8 Content Migration Training at DrupalCon Seattle 2019 January 02, Wednesday, at 11:41am Clayton Dewey Agaric is facilitating a full day training at DrupalCon Seattle to help you understand how to import content into your to Drupal 8 website. Read more

Mediacurrent: Contrib Committee Review for November 2018

Mié, 01/02/2019 - 12:11

With the year winding down the month was a little quiet, but we still got some good contributions going.

Client sponsored

Thanks to our awesome clients for giving us a chance to help make open source software better for everyone.

Self-directed

Mediacurrent provides some extra time during the week for folks to scratch their own itches, and sometimes people triage issue queues instead of watching football on TV :-)

Blog posts

A little light this month, but there are still two good blog posts from our team.

Contrib Half Hour

We squeezed in four Contrib Half Hour meetings into the month, despite the company being closed for Turkey Day.

Events

Lots of folks were working on their presentation proposals for DrupalCon Seattle 2019. see Tara’s blog post for details. There are also several events coming up soon that we’ll be attending, including DrupalCamp NJ and Florida DrupalCamp in February and then NERDSummit in March.

Stay warm!

That’s it for this month. Hope everyone in the Northern Hemisphere stays warm, everyone in the Southern Hemisphere enjoys their summer, and the folks in the middle don’t brag too much!

ComputerMinds.co.uk: Drupal 7, 8 and 9 - When to Migrate

Mié, 01/02/2019 - 11:48

Anyone familiar with the Drupal core development lifecycle will know that presently the Drupal community supports two major versions at any one time: the current major release and its immediate predecessor. This means that at ComputerMinds we are currently helping our clients support and develop both Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 sites. So the obvious question that we get asked is ‘when is it time to upgrade’?

We can’t properly answer this question without bringing the next major release, Drupal 9, into the mix. So let’s look at the development timeline for these three versions. According to a blog post by Dries both Drupal 7 and 8 will have an end of life of no later than November 2021 with Drupal 9 being released roughly a year earlier in June 2020 to give site owners enough time to move over to Drupal 9. It is worth noting that from November 2021 only Drupal 9 will be supported. Dries outlines these dates with a whole bunch of details in this blog post.

Historically, migrating between major versions has been a considerable chunk of work as major versions aren’t backwards compatible; however, the good news is that migrating from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 should be a very straightforward process - so long as you’ve kept your Drupal 8 site up-to-date! This is good news for anyone that’s already taken the plunge into the world of Drupal 8 as the migration process shouldn’t really be any more involved than a minor upgrade. This is because the only real changes will be to remove deprecated code and update dependencies, such as Symfony (Symfony 3 has an end of life of November 2021, hence this date being cut off for support for Drupal 8).

For site owners still using Drupal 7 the question of when to upgrade is slightly more complicated. Do you wait for Drupal 9 and skip Drupal 8, or should you upgrade now? As previously mentioned we can be reasonably confident that upgrading from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 will be a straightforward process, so we don’t need to worry about having to redo lots of work a couple of years down the line if we do migrate to Drupal 8 now. So the question of when to migrate really varies depending on your current circumstance and preference.

Some site owners will want to benefit from new functionality added in Drupal 8 so will want to upgrade their Drupal 7 sites as soon as possible, whilst obviously factoring in how difficult and expensive the migration will be. Others will be perfectly happy sticking with Drupal 7 until support has ended, at which point they will have to port over in order to keep their site secure. Another piece of good news for anyone weighing up their options with Drupal 7 is that support for Drupal 7 will also be extended to November 2021 (previously support would have ended for Drupal 7 as soon as Drupal 9 was released) so this gives you another year to implement your migration to Drupal 9.

So the short answer of when to migrate your Drupal 7 site is really whenever is good for you. There’s no immediate rush and if you do opt to migrate to Drupal 8, as long as you keep your site up-to-date, upgrading to Drupal 9 when the time comes should be a cinch!

Matt Glaman: Two Zero One Nine

Mié, 01/02/2019 - 11:06
Two Zero One Nine Published on Wednesday 2, January 2019 2018 was a weird year. It felt like it just zoomed by and nothing eventful happened. In fact, I feel like most people I have talked to this year felt the same exact way. But, then I sat down to my end of year write up and realized that this year was way more packed than I thought.

ComputerMinds.co.uk: Peer Review

Mié, 01/02/2019 - 08:27

At ComputerMinds we like to think that we’re all pretty good at what we do; however, nobody is perfect and this is why we always ensure that our code is properly peer reviewed as part of our quality assurance process.

Peer review is literally just what the name implies; we work together to review each other’s code to make sure that it all makes sense. This approach means that we’re able to spot obvious mistakes before they become a problem. It also has the huge advantage of allowing us to transfer knowledge between our team on a day-to-day basis.

Pull Requests

The primary way we peer our code is to make use of GitHub’s pull requests (PR) feature. This means that whenever we need to do some work on a Git repo we start by creating a new feature branch which will contain the chunk of work that we’re doing. Then once we are happy with the code we’ve written in this branch we’ll go over to GitHub and create a PR to merge our branch in with another branch which we know is stable, for example the master branch. Before this merge happens GitHub’s PR tool will show all the changes between the the two branches so that they can be reviewed by another developer.

At ComputerMinds we use pull requests a lot. We don’t like to work directly on a stable branch as this way there is much more chance the bugs might slip through the net. By using pull requests we can be sure that our code is properly sanity checked before it makes its way over to a stable environment, be that a client facing testing branch or the live branch. GitHub also makes it easy to add comments directly to the pull request so any issues are full documented and feedback is clearly displayed.

Face to face

When dealing with a more in-depth code change, it's particularly helpful to talk face-to-face, as it allows the original developer to talk you through their changes and the thinking behind them. This allows the reviewer to have a much better understanding of what the original developer was aiming to achieve and to sanity-check their thinking. A 'meatspace' chat can be more difficult to achieve than just getting some comments on a pull request, but it's often worth the effort.

Finding the right fit

Both of these methods have their strengths and weaknesses. Pull requests are quick and easy to use; however, when dealing with larger sets of changes things may get overlooked, or may not be properly understood without knowledge of the bigger picture. Face to face reviews obviously take up more resources to conduct the review but do allow for a more in-depth review where the bigger picture can be clearly explained by the original developer.

Obviously it goes without saying that these two approaches to peer review aren’t mutually exclusive - there are plenty of meatspace chats going on around the office about various PRs.

At ComputerMinds we're still working on how we do code review. There's always room for growth and for change, and we're actively promoting discussion amongst our team to see how we can do better.

How do you do quality assurance and review on your code? Share your thoughts and tips with us below!

The Accidental Coder: 8: Adding an admin page with a config settings form to a custom module

Mar, 01/01/2019 - 00:19
8: Adding an admin page with a config settings form to a custom module ayen Mon, 12/31/2018 - 21:19

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